Buddhism

  • Feeding Your Demons Paid Member

    We all have demons. They're not nasty ghouls or goblins or things with horns—they're worse. In "Feeding Your Demons," from the Summer 2008 Tricycle, Tsultrim Allione describes them this way: Demons are our obsessions and fears, feelings of insecurity, chronic illnesses, or common problems like depression, anxiety, and addiction. Feeding our demons rather than fighting them may seem to contradict the conventional approach of attacking and attempting to eliminate that which assails us, but it turns out to be a remarkable alternative and an effective path to liberation from all dichotomies. More »
  • Sharon Salzberg turns up on Daily Kos Paid Member

    Daily Kos diarist "Geenius at Wrok" has an affinity for vipassana meditation, and today writes at some length on his introduction to Sharon Salzberg's teachings on metta (loving-kindness) practice. GaW even manages to send good thoughts to Sen. Chuck Grassley (überR-Iowa, pictured here)—no mean feat for a Daily Kos diarist. He also adds a political touch of his own, though, which some may consider cheating: May you be free of pain and sorrow. May you also help end needless pain and sorrow caused by pvt health ins. More »
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    Mandalas, Jung and the Cosmos Paid Member

    It never gets dull at the Rubin Museum of Art, in New York City. Home to a one of—if not the—most comprehensive collections of Himalayan art, the Rubin never disappoints. This August the museum, housed in what was once Barney's downtown fashion emporium, will begin a three-part "Cosmology series," leading with an exhibit on the history and meaning of the mandala. "The Mandala: The Perfect Circle," opens on August 14th and runs through January 11, 2010. According to Martin Brauer, the museum's chief curator, More »
  • Pico Iyer on the Dalai Lama Paid Member

    Nice blog post on the Dalai Lama by Pico Iyer. Here's a taste: Not long ago, I was traveling with the Dalai Lama across Japan and another journalist came into our bullet-train compartment for an interview. “Your Holiness,” he said, “you have seen so much sorrow and loss in your life. Your people have been killed and your country has been occupied. You have had to worry about the welfare of Tibet every day since you were four years old. How can you always remain so happy and smiling?” "My profession," said the Dalai Lama instantly, as if he hardly had to think about it. Read "The Doctor is Within" here. More »
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    Candidate can't expect a Buddhist bounce Paid Member

    Erik Curren, Democratic candidate for Virginia's House of Delegates, is a practicing Buddhist who also calls himself a Christian. Curren says practicing Christianity and Buddhism are not mutually exclusive, according to The News Leader, which covers the central Shenandoah Valley and the district in which Curren is running. But Curren can't expect a Buddhist bounce. At least that's what Augusta County Supervisor Tracy Pyles thinks: "I asked Curren about his faith and he told me he is a Buddhist, and for me, that is an issue... More »
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    What's the happiest country in the world? Paid Member

    Denmark, according to author and self-described grump Eric Weiner, who relies on the Eurobarometer Survey for evidence in his opinion piece in yesterday's New York Times: More than two-thirds of Danes report being “very satisfied with their lives.” The reason? Low expectations. Apparently, the Danes don't expect much to go well and when things do, they're, well, happy: Danes have low expectations and so “year after year they are pleasantly surprised to find out that not everything is rotten in the state of Denmark,” says James W. Vaupel, a demographer who has investigated Danish bliss. If this all sounds vaguely Buddhist, Weiner thinks so, too: Though not an especially religious people, Danes would make good Buddhists. More »