Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Is there an ethical way to visit Burma? Paid Member

    There has been plenty of discussion about the ethics of traveling to Burma, although its repressive government has been impervious to just about any kind of pressure the outside world applies. While there are Buddhist practitioners who visit monasteries to practice on extended retreats, most other travel has been frowned upon by many activists. But today's Washington Post lists a few tour agencies that "are mindful of the ongoing ethical debate about visiting Burma and have taken measures to ensure that at least some of their tourist dollars go to support small, locally owned businesses and not the repressive military dictatorship." More »
  • The Just War: Do the Buddhist teachings ever allow for violence? Paid Member

    A lively discussion followed a recent post here on the Army's first Buddhist chaplain. The latest response comes from John Scorsine, a military officer in the National Guard and a newly ordained Buddhist minister, who writes, "This question of the reconciliation of Buddhism and being a professional at arms has been a defining matter of inquiry for me." Scorsine continues, describing his discussion of this issue with the Dalai Lama: When I asked HHDL what in his view was the karmic consequence for killing for one’s country or for being killed in battle he responed: “And over here, liturgically speaking, most important is motivation and goal. Now goal to serve interest for larger community and motivation – compassionate motivation. Genuine sense of care. And then, if the circumstances, there’s no other way, only the violent way, then violence is permissible. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Daily Dharma - The sound of one dog barking Paid Member

    Human beings understand too much. But what they understand is just somebody's opinion. Like a dog barking. American dogs say, "Woof, woof." Korean dogs say, "Mung, mung." Polish dogs say, "How, how." So which dog barking is correct? This is human beings' barking, not dog barking. If dog and you become one hundred percent one, then you know sound of barking. This is Zen teaching. Boom! Become one. –Seung Sahn, from "Boom! More »
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    Sit down, rise up! Paid Member

    Ethan Nicthern's One City: A Declaration of Independence will give you a pretty good idea of what his work is all about. Committed to creating a "bridge" between contemplative practice and activism, Nichtern and his organization, the Interdependence Project, have evolved since the book appeared. We've seen the launch of Beliefnet's One City blog and  the growth and increasing visibility of the ID Project, which has recently relaunched its website. More »
  • More tools to navigate your way through the rich world of Tibetan art Paid Member

    Yesterday I linked to a page that shows you how to identify and understand the deities of the Tibetan pantheon. More »
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    Daily Dharma: Does Compassion Come Naturally? Paid Member

    Q: Doesn’t it come to us naturally that it’s in our self-interest to extend compassion to those beyond our local groups? A: No, it doesn't. Because to worry about what some disenchanted Muslim teenager in Pakistan is feeling right now does not come naturally in the sense of visceral response. It does, however, make intellectual sense; the world is moving to a point where, if only out of self-interest, we need to think about that person. One virtue of some of the religious traditions is that they have well-worked-out procedures for assisting this intellectual process. In other words, it's one thing to realize logically that my fate is intertwined with the fate of Muslims around the world: If they're unhappy, they'll eventually make me unhappy. But it's another to feel it, to look at someone and get a deep sense of fraternity with them. That's where religious practice plays an important role. More »