Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    More on the Biggest Buddha in the World Paid Member

    No, it's not the guy in front. Some time ago I wrote about China's Leshan Buddha, in southern Sichuan, the "biggest Buddha in the world." One reader tipped us off to a video, which gives a better idea of the Buddha's size. Now,  Jeff Watt (Himalayan Art Resource) has posted a picture of himself in front of the famed rock sculpture. You can read more about the Leshan Buddha at "Jeff's Travels." Since posting several weeks back, I've received more Leshan Buddha pix than I can post, but keep them coming, I enjoy them. More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    The Karmapa on Hip-Hop & Video War Games: : "The aggression that comes out in the video game satiates whatever desire I might have to express that feeling." Paid Member

    Video game site kotaku.com points us to an interview with Trinley Dorje, the 17th Karmapa (the one recognized by the Dalai Lama and the Chinese government), who enjoys hip-hop and considers video war games a kind of "emotional therapy": I believe you like to listen to hip-hop on your ipod. Who are your favourite artistes? I can't think of any specific artists right now, I basically listen to what ever comes my way, whatever sounds appealing. It's important for me to stick to my traditional forms of art because I am a Tibetan Buddhist teacher wearing these robes. It's important for me to maintain my cultural affiliations. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Pick your favorite Dalai Lama Paid Member

    You know plenty about Tenzin Gyatso, His Holiness the 14th Dalai Lama. But what about the 13 who preceded him? There's an easy way to learn about them all at Himalayan Art Resource's Dalai Lama Incarnation Lineage page. More »
  • Why do we gossip? Paid Member

    Gossip can mean many things, from benignly shared information about someone not present to false rumors insidiously spread, to idle chitchat about someone’s personal life. The question to ask is: What is our motivation when we talk about others? From a Buddhist perspective, the value of our speech depends principally upon the motivation behind it. When talking about others is motivated by thoughts of ill will, jealousy, or attachment, conversations turn into gossip. These thoughts may seem to be subconscious, but if we pay close attention to our mind we’ll be able to catch them in the act. Many of these are thoughts that we don’t want to acknowledge to ourselves, let alone to others, but my experience is that when I become courageous enough to notice and admit them, I’m on my way to letting them go. Also, there’s a certain humor to the illogical way that these negative thoughts purport to bring us happiness. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Everyday Insights Paid Member

    Laypeople live in the realm of sensuality. They have families, money, and possessions, and are deeply involved in all sorts of activities. Yet sometimes they will gain insight and see dharma before monks and nuns do. Why is this? It’s because of their suffering from all these things. They see the fault and can let go. They can put it down after seeing clearly in their experience. More »
  • Praise and Blame Paid Member

    If we really stop to think about praise and criticism, we will see they do not have the least importance. Whether we receive praise or criticism is of no account. The only important thing is that we have a pure motivation, and let the law of cause and effect be our witness. If we are really honest, we can see that it makes no difference whether we receive praise and acclaim. The whole world might sing our praises, but if we have done something wrong, then we will still have to suffer the consequences for ourselves, and we cannot escape them. If we act only out of a pure motivation, all the beings of the three realms can criticize and rebuke us, but none of them will be able to cause us to suffer. According to the law of karma, each and every one of us must answer individually for our actions. This is how we can put a stop to these kinds of thoughts altogether, by seeing how they are completely insubstantial, like dreams or magical illusions. More »