Buddhism

  • Namkha Rinpoche visits Tricycle Paid Member

    Sopranos actor Michael Imperioli (aka Christopher Moltisanti) presented his film The Hungry Ghosts, his directorial debut, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City this month. The screening was a fundraiser for Namkha Rinpoche's charitable organization, The Golden Bridge Association, a not-for-profit dedicated to humanitarian aid and the preservation of Tibetan culture and religion. More »
  • Awakening is not the same thing as Bliss Paid Member

    There may be bliss with awakening, because it is actually a by-product of awakening, but it is not awakening itself. As long as we are chasing the by-product of awakening, we will miss the real thing. - Adyashanti, from “Bliss is a By-Product,” Tricycle, Summer 2009 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Don't be afraid of pain Paid Member

    Sometimes I think anticipation of pain is far worse than the pain itself. That's not to diminish the reality of pain, but it's a fact that we've all got to deal with it so why not find a way to be with it? It goes against the grain, but Buddhists have traditionally seen in pain an opportunity for practice. (Granted, this was before the Fentanyl patch.) Not for everyone, but for those it does work for, it makes plenty of good sense. Try it next time you've got a toothache on the weekend. Read Upasika Kee Nanayon's "Tough Teachings to Ease the Mind" here. More »
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    (Updated): The Buddha that won't go away: Picture of the Week Paid Member

    I know, I know, you've heard too much about the biggest Buddha in the world. Some of you aren't convinced, though (read Vern's comment in the last post). So here's a pic that will give you a better sense of scale. Are you convinced? We can't promise it's true; maybe there's another giganta-Buddha out there. Can someone please find a bigger Buddha? It's not gonna be easy. Himalayan Art Resource director Jeff Watt tells us it's "bigger than Bamiyan." But if you do outsize this one, the first to alert us gets a copy of Sharon Salzberg's Unplug. But be warned—Wikipedia tells us: More »
  • Seven Tips for Giving Up Gossip Paid Member

    by Bhikshuni Thubten Chodron 1. Recognize that gossip doesn’t undo the situation you’re talking about. It only puts in motion another situation based on negative feelings. 2. Know that comparing yourself to others is useless. Everyone has his or her own talents. In this way, give up jealousy and the wish to put others down. 3. Be aware of and transform your own thoughts, words, and deeds rather than commenting on those of others. 4. Train your mind to see others’ positive qualities and discuss them. This will make you much happier than gossiping ever could. 5. Forgive, knowing that people do harmful things because they are unhappy. If you don’t make someone into an enemy, you won’t want to gossip about him. More »
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    Buddhist Intolerance? Paid Member

    Buddhism is often considered a religion of tolerance. In many ways it is. But a particular kind of intolerance develops as we practice: intolerance to suffering. I use the word “intolerance” to be deliberately provocative, to encourage you to reflect on suffering and the issues surrounding it. Taking suffering seriously is an important element of Buddhist practice. To ignore it is to miss a powerful opportunity. Intolerance to suffering motivated the Buddha to find liberation from it. Suffering, a feeling of dissatisfaction with life, motivates people to engage in spiritual practice. More »