Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    As natural as breathing - Daily Dharma, September 23rd, 2009 Paid Member

    In order to communicate very openly with the world, you need to develop fundamental trust. This kind of trust is not trusting “in” something, but simply trusting. It is very much like your breath. You do not consciously hold on to your breath, or trust in your breath, yet breathing is your very nature. In the same way, to be trusting is your very nature. To be trusting means you are fundamentally free from doubt about your goodness and about the goodness of others. – Dr. Jeremy Hayward, from “First Thought,” Tricycle, Spring 1995 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Tricycle Community 13 comments

    Do liberals give Buddhism a pass? Paid Member

    I listen to discussions of Christianity from time to time on NPR and it seems that it's simply required in such conversations to take the "magic" out of the Judeo-Christian narratives. But when the religion in question is Buddhism, it's apparently fine to suspend one's rationalist mind. –Jonah Goldberg, National Review Online Jonah Goldberg seems to think that liberals give the Dalai Lama—and Buddhism—a pass when it comes to claims of the miraculous. Pico Iyer, for instance, discusses the Dalai Lama's most recent incarnation as Goldberg "would expect a believing Buddhist to tell it"—that is, without skepticism. We can't blame Goldberg for thinking that Pico Iyer is a Buddhist (he isn't), since Iyer has written plenty about all things Buddhist, including articles in Tricycle, and has been quite close to the Dalai Lama. But are "liberals" generally easier on Buddhism than, say, Christianity, as Goldberg contends? Not always. More »
  • Three Takes on Nirvana Paid Member

    Nirvana, the ultimate goal of Buddhist practice, is a notoriously difficult concept to pin down, not least because it is sometimes described as being "beyond experience" or "beyond words." This is another way of saying that we here in samsara have a hard time wrapping our heads around what this transcendent experience would mean. And to complicate things further, the different Buddhist traditions often have very different understandings of what precisely "nirvana" means. Some time ago, we asked three dharma teachers to help us understand this better: Vipassana teacher Gil Fronsdal, Tibetan-born Tulku Thubten Rinpoche, and Zen teacher Roko Sherry Chayat. You can read all three takes here. [Image: Tisra Til, 2005, mixed media on canvas, 120 x 140 inches. © Antonio Puri] More »
  • Namkha Rinpoche visits Tricycle Paid Member

    Sopranos actor Michael Imperioli (aka Christopher Moltisanti) presented his film The Hungry Ghosts, his directorial debut, at the Rubin Museum of Art in New York City this month. The screening was a fundraiser for Namkha Rinpoche's charitable organization, The Golden Bridge Association, a not-for-profit dedicated to humanitarian aid and the preservation of Tibetan culture and religion. More »
  • Awakening is not the same thing as Bliss Paid Member

    There may be bliss with awakening, because it is actually a by-product of awakening, but it is not awakening itself. As long as we are chasing the by-product of awakening, we will miss the real thing. - Adyashanti, from “Bliss is a By-Product,” Tricycle, Summer 2009 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Sign up for the Daily Dharma or Tricycle Community Newsletter More »
  • Don't be afraid of pain Paid Member

    Sometimes I think anticipation of pain is far worse than the pain itself. That's not to diminish the reality of pain, but it's a fact that we've all got to deal with it so why not find a way to be with it? It goes against the grain, but Buddhists have traditionally seen in pain an opportunity for practice. (Granted, this was before the Fentanyl patch.) Not for everyone, but for those it does work for, it makes plenty of good sense. Try it next time you've got a toothache on the weekend. Read Upasika Kee Nanayon's "Tough Teachings to Ease the Mind" here. More »