Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Don't Go It Alone Paid Member

    Aristotle said that in order for people to become virtuous, we need role models—others who have developed their capacities for courage, self-control, wisdom, and justice. We may emphasize different sets of virtues or ideas about what makes a proper role model, but Buddhism also asserts that, as we are all connected and interdependent, none of us can do it all on our own. Acknowledging this dependency is the first step of real emotional work within relationships. Our ambivalence about our own needs and dependency gets stirred up in all kinds of relationships. We cannot escape our feelings and needs and desires if we are going to be in relationships with others. More »
  • Come and See Paid Member

    Perhaps because of our Judeo-Christian background, we have a tendency to regard doubt as something shameful, almost as an enemy. We feel that if we have doubts, it means that we are denying the teachings and that we should really have unquestioning faith. Now in certain religions, unquestioning faith is considered a desirable quality. But in the Buddha-dharma, this is not necessarily so. Referring to the dharma, the Buddha said, “ehi passiko,” which means “come and see,” or “come and investigate,” not “come and believe.” An open, questioning mind is not regarded as a drawback to followers of the Buddha-dharma. However, a mind that says, “This is not part of my mental framework, therefore I don't believe it,” is a closed mind, and such an attitude is a great disadvantage for those who aspire to follow any spiritual path. More »
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Descending the Mountain: John Daido Loori steps down Paid Member

    UPDATE 3: Here is Daido Roshi's New York Times obituary. UPDATE 2: Roshi John Daido Loori left this sphere of practice at 7:30AM this morning. If you would like to read Zen Master Bernie Glassman's eulogy, please click here. UPDATE: The Mountains and Rivers Order reports that Daido Roshi has only a few days left to live. The ceremony scheduled for this weekend has been canceled. From October 1st: More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Practice is not something we do; it is something we are Paid Member

    Our lives, like the ocean, constantly change, and we will naturally face great storms and dreary lulls. How, then, to put our minds in a space where practice is always there, whether tumultuous or in the doldrums? It requires a completely radical view of practice: practice is not something we do; it is something we are. We are not separate from our practice, and so no matter what, our practice is present. An ocean swimmer is loose and flows with the current and moves through the tide. More »
  • Tricycle Community 8 comments

    Revealing a World of Bliss Paid Member

    Norman FIscher re-tells the famous story about Mahakashyapa on Vulture's Peak: When Buddha was on Vulture Peak he twirled a flower before the assembly. Everyone was silent. Only Mahakashyapa smiled. Buddha said: "I have the eye treasury of the true teaching, the heart of nirvana, the true form of non-form, and the ineffable gate of dharma. It is a special transmission outside the teaching. I now entrust it to Mahakashyapa." Read, "Revealing a World of Bliss," from the pages of Tricycle. More »
  • Giving up is a good thing Paid Member

    The practice of seeing clearly is what finally moves us toward kindness. Seeing, again and again, the infinite variety of traps we create for seducing the mind into struggle, seeing the endless rounds of meaningless suffering over lusts and aversions (which, although seemingly urgent, are essentially empty), we feel compassion for ourselves. And then, quite naturally, we feel compassion for everyone else. We know as we have never known before that we are stuck, all of us, with bodies and minds and instincts and impulses, all in a tug-of-war with our basic heart nature that yearns to relax into love. Then we surrender. We love. We laugh. More »