Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Descending the Mountain: John Daido Loori steps down Paid Member

    UPDATE 3: Here is Daido Roshi's New York Times obituary. UPDATE 2: Roshi John Daido Loori left this sphere of practice at 7:30AM this morning. If you would like to read Zen Master Bernie Glassman's eulogy, please click here. UPDATE: The Mountains and Rivers Order reports that Daido Roshi has only a few days left to live. The ceremony scheduled for this weekend has been canceled. From October 1st: More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Practice is not something we do; it is something we are Paid Member

    Our lives, like the ocean, constantly change, and we will naturally face great storms and dreary lulls. How, then, to put our minds in a space where practice is always there, whether tumultuous or in the doldrums? It requires a completely radical view of practice: practice is not something we do; it is something we are. We are not separate from our practice, and so no matter what, our practice is present. An ocean swimmer is loose and flows with the current and moves through the tide. More »
  • Tricycle Community 8 comments

    Revealing a World of Bliss Paid Member

    Norman FIscher re-tells the famous story about Mahakashyapa on Vulture's Peak: When Buddha was on Vulture Peak he twirled a flower before the assembly. Everyone was silent. Only Mahakashyapa smiled. Buddha said: "I have the eye treasury of the true teaching, the heart of nirvana, the true form of non-form, and the ineffable gate of dharma. It is a special transmission outside the teaching. I now entrust it to Mahakashyapa." Read, "Revealing a World of Bliss," from the pages of Tricycle. More »
  • Giving up is a good thing Paid Member

    The practice of seeing clearly is what finally moves us toward kindness. Seeing, again and again, the infinite variety of traps we create for seducing the mind into struggle, seeing the endless rounds of meaningless suffering over lusts and aversions (which, although seemingly urgent, are essentially empty), we feel compassion for ourselves. And then, quite naturally, we feel compassion for everyone else. We know as we have never known before that we are stuck, all of us, with bodies and minds and instincts and impulses, all in a tug-of-war with our basic heart nature that yearns to relax into love. Then we surrender. We love. We laugh. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Am I There Yet? Paid Member

    The path of awakening is extremely well mapped, and it’s mapped in different ways by different traditions. At certain stages maps can be useful; they point out the way. But at other stages they can be a big hindrance, because we often get caught up in interpretation and judgment: “How far along am I?” “Am I there?” These thoughts simply strengthen the sense of self, while the whole path is about dissolving it. And particularly in our Western culture, which is so competitive and judgmental, instead of adding more fuel to the fire of self-judgment—”Oh, where am I? I’m not good enough”—we could see our entire spiritual journey as this wonderful flowering of understanding. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Andrew Sullivan on the need for Buddhist-Christian dialogue Paid Member

    The always-thoughtful Andrew Sullivan continues his exploration of Buddhism. Here he is on Thomas Merton: I think a conversation between Christians and Buddhists - the project Merton was intent on before he died - is one of the more important conversations of our time. Merton was truly one of the great religious thinkers of our time, taken from us too early. Here he is on getting through difficult times: Prayer and love are learned in the hour when prayer becomes impossible and the heart has turned to stone. More »