• Tricycle Community 2 comments

    December 8: Celebration of the Buddha's Enlightenment Paid Member

    What to do to celebrate the day that marks the Buddha's enlightenment, or "the Buddha's Big E," as Wild Fox Zen's Dosho Port has it? Here's what Dosho writes before he offers us a ceremony for our home practice: In our tradition, we commemorate the Buddha's Enlightenment Day on December 8th. Zen lore has it that after sitting under the bodhi tree for seven days, the Buddha looked up, saw the morning star and roared his lion's roar, "I together with the great earth and all living beings, attain the Way." You can take part in the do-it-yourself ceremony here. More »
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    Angry Chef Paid Member

    Ed Brown has been practicing Buddhism—and cooking—for the past four decades. Author of The Tassajara Bread Book and subject of the documentary How to Cook Your Life, Brown is known to be, well, peevish, and Slashfood has now playfully dubbed him "the angry chef." Nice little writeup, take a look here. UPDATE: Forgot to mention the deluxe edition of the beloved classic Tassajara Bread Book, released in August by Shambhala Publications. Great Christmas gift! More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Day to Day Paid Member

    Perhaps we'd much rather focus on a great transcendent state of consciousness out there somewhere, waiting for us to achieve it. But it is in how we live day-to-day that an authentic spirituality is made manifest. - Sharon Salzberg, The Force of Kindness Read Sharon's article "A Quiver of the Heart," and see Sharon's Online Retreat on Kindness on tricycle.com More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Can the Buddha save the economy? Paid Member

    Somewhere between John Maynard Keynes and Milton Friedman sits the Buddha. Here's how Stefan Padfield, assistant law professor at the University of Akron, puts it over at Akron Law Cafe: [W]hat I’m really interested in is this idea that one can in fact neatly separate centralized government and the private sector.  And this is where the Buddha comes in. More »
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    The Way Out Paid Member

    Like someone lost in the forest, if you're not really convinced that there's a way out, you give up very easily. You run into a thicket here, a steep cliff there, and it just seems way too much. But if you're convinced there's got to be a way out, you've heard of other people who've made their way out, you think, "It's got to be in here someplace." You keep looking, looking, looking. And finally you see how the other people made their way out: "Oh. That was the path they took." -Thanissaro Bhikkhu, "Power of Conviction," Tricycle, Winter 2006 Read the full article: Power of Conviction More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    A Refuge Unto Yourself Paid Member

    The Buddha never meant for us to take as our mainstay anything or anyone else aside from ourselves. Even when we take refuge in the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha, he never praised it as being really ideal. He wanted us to take ourselves as our refuge: "The self is its own mainstay." We can depend on ourselves and govern ourselves. We're free. When we can reach this state, that's when we'll be released from our enslavement to greed, anger, and delusion—and be truly happy. -Ajaan Lee, "Sowing the Seeds of Freedom," Tricycle, Spring 2008 Read the complete article on tricycle.com. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. More »