Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Just This Much Paid Member

    Full attention is both an activity of learning and the actualization of unconditional love. It is this selfless, choiceless love that heals the illusion of separateness, brokenness, and alienation, yielding a gratification, faith and confidence not dependent on external or internal conditions beyond our control. Practice-Life is the dynamic activity of bringing full attention to what is presenting itself most clearly in the awareness for as long as it is there, and with deepening simplicity and joy, knowing Just This Much! –Douglas Phillips, from “On the Cushion: Q & A with Douglas Phillips,” Tricycle, Spring 2003 Read the full article: On The Cushion: Q & A with Douglas Phillips More »
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    Mindfulness in the Hospital Paid Member

    Work on that bedside manner, docs. More »
  • What is the Right Way to Sit? Paid Member

    Different Buddhist schools recommend a variety of meditative postures. Some emphasize a still, formal posture, while others are less strict and more focused on internal movements of consciousness. Tibetan traditions, for instance, advise an upright spine, erect but relaxed; hands at rest in the lap, with the belly soft; shoulders relaxed, chin slightly tucked, and the gaze lowered with eyelids half shut; the jaw is slack with the tongue behind the upper teeth; the legs are crossed. A Soto Zen Buddhist saying instructs us to sit with formal body and informal mind. The common essential point is to remain balanced and alert, so as to pierce the veil of samsaric illusion. –Lama Surya Das, from “The Heart of Buddhist Meditation,” Tricycle, Winter 2007 Read the full article: The Heart of Buddhist Meditation More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Kindness to Oneself Paid Member

    One way to develop metta within us is through the following meditation practice, which we start by extending loving feelings toward ourselves. It's very simple: At first, sit in some comfortable position, and keeping an image or felt sense of yourself in mind, slowly repeat phrases of lovingkindness for yourself: May I be happy, may I be peaceful, may I be free of suffering. Say these or like phrases over and over again. We do this not as an affirmation, but as an expression of a caring intention. As you repeat the words, focus the mind on this intention of kindness; it slowly grows into a powerful force in our lives. Although the practice is straightforward, it can be extremely difficult. As you turn your attention inward and send loving wishes toward yourself, you may see a considerable amount of self-judgment or feelings of unworthiness. At these times, proceed gently, as if you were holding a young child. More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Books will get you part of the way Paid Member

    For most of us born in the Western world, remote from Buddhism of any institutional kind, knowledge of the dhamma has come entirely from books and, occasionally, spoken words, some quite excellent and informative, certainly. But this kind of learning still retains a somewhat ethereal air in the absence of actions, traditions, and spiritual observances in which we can participate. That the Buddhist religion has survived so long in the world is a result not so much of the durability of manuscripts as of the power of ideas embodied in custom; and custom, for all our abundant sources of information, is what we lack and cannot in the long run do without. More »
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    All Together Now Paid Member

    The more you can come to see everyone as yourself, the more you will be able to use everything around you to learn about who you are, and the more you will be able to transform yourself and be an occasion for everyone else's transformation. We are all sentient beings, and we are all capable of experiencing one another's salvation. More »