Buddhism

  • Tips on Mindfulness Meditation from Sayadaw U Tejaniya Paid Member

    BEFORE WE START practicing mindfulness meditation, we must know how to practice. We need to have the right information and a clear understanding of the practice to work with awareness intelligently. This information will work at the back of your mind when you meditate. 1. Meditating is watching and waiting patiently with awareness and understanding. Meditation is not trying to experience something you have read about or heard about. 2. When meditating, both the body and mind should be comfortable. 3. You are not trying to make things turn out the way you want them to happen. You are trying to know what is happening as it is. Read the rest here. Image © sayadawutejaniya.org More »
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    Taming the Mind Paid Member

    Ancient Pali texts liken meditation to the process of taming a wild elephant. The procedure in those days was to tie a newly captured animal to a post with a good strong rope. When you do this, the elephant is not happy. He screams and tramples, and pulls against the rope for days. Finally it sinks through his skull that he can’t get away, and he settles down. At this point you can begin to feed him and to handle him with some measure of safety. Eventually you can dispense with the rope and post altogether, and train your elephant for various tasks. Now you’ve got a tamed elephant that can be put to useful work. In this analogy the wild elephant is your wildly active mind, the rope is mindfulness, and the post is our object of meditation, our breathing. The tamed elephant who emerges from this process is a well-trained, concentrated mind that can then be used for the exceedingly tough job of piercing the layers of illusion that obscure reality. More »
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    Fantasy Versus Imagination Paid Member

    Imagination draws its energy from a confrontation with desire. It feeds off desire, transmuting and magnifying reality through desire’s power. Fantasy does the opposite; it avoids desire by fleeing into a crude sort of wish-fulfillment that seems much safer. Fantasy might be teddy bears, lollipops, sexual delights, or superhero adventures; it also might be voices in one’s head urging acts of outrage and mayhem. Or it might be the confused world of separation and fear we routinely live in, a threatening yet seductive world that promises us the happiness we seek when our fantasies finally become real. Imagination confronts desire directly, in all its discomfort and intensity, deepening the world right where we are. More »
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    A Handful of Knowledge Paid Member

    There aren’t that many fundamental, or root, principles of dharma. The Buddha said that his teaching is “a single handful.” A passage in the Samyutta-nikaya makes that clear. While walking through the forest, the Buddha picked up a handful of fallen leaves and asked the monks who were present to decide which was the greater amount, the leaves in his hand or all the leaves in the forest. Of course, they all said that there were more leaves in the forest, that the difference was beyond comparison. Try to imagine the truth of this scene; clearly see how huge the difference is. The Buddha then said that, similarly, those things that he had realized were a great amount, equal to all the leaves in the forest. More »
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    The Joy of Effort Paid Member

    While it’s true that both repetition and relaxation can bring results in meditation, when either is pursued to the exclusion of the other, it leads to a dead end. If, however, you can integrate them both into the greater skill of learning how to apply whatever level of effort the practice requires at any given moment, they can take you far. This greater skill requires strong powers of mindfulness, concentration, and discernment, and if you stick with it, it can lead you all the way to the Buddha’s ultimate aim in teaching meditation: nirvana, a totally unconditioned happiness, free from the constraints of space and time. - Thanissaro Bhikkhu, from "The Joy of Effort,” Tricycle, Summer 2008 Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. Read the full article: The Joy of Effort More »
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    His Holiness the 17th Karmapa to speak at TEDIndia Paid Member

    This weekend the 17th Gyalwang Karmapa, Ogyen Trinley Dorje, will join the ranks of previous TED speakers Bill Clinton, Al Gore and Jane Goodall when he presents at this year's TED conference. The annual invitation-only TED events bring together over 1,000 delegates from 35 countries around the world to present on "ideas worth spreading." This year's conference will be held in Mysore, India with the theme "celebrating and exploring the beckoning future of South Asia." His Holiness the 17th Karmapa is scheduled to give a talk entitled "Within You Without You" on Saturday as part of the four day assembly. The Times of India has set up a webcast site where visitors can watch the TED talks live. More »