Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Can the Buddha save the economy? Paid Member

    Somewhere between John Maynard Keynes and Milton Friedman sits the Buddha. Here's how Stefan Padfield, assistant law professor at the University of Akron, puts it over at Akron Law Cafe: [W]hat I’m really interested in is this idea that one can in fact neatly separate centralized government and the private sector.  And this is where the Buddha comes in. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    The Way Out Paid Member

    Like someone lost in the forest, if you're not really convinced that there's a way out, you give up very easily. You run into a thicket here, a steep cliff there, and it just seems way too much. But if you're convinced there's got to be a way out, you've heard of other people who've made their way out, you think, "It's got to be in here someplace." You keep looking, looking, looking. And finally you see how the other people made their way out: "Oh. That was the path they took." -Thanissaro Bhikkhu, "Power of Conviction," Tricycle, Winter 2006 Read the full article: Power of Conviction More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    A Refuge Unto Yourself Paid Member

    The Buddha never meant for us to take as our mainstay anything or anyone else aside from ourselves. Even when we take refuge in the Buddha, Dhamma, and Sangha, he never praised it as being really ideal. He wanted us to take ourselves as our refuge: "The self is its own mainstay." We can depend on ourselves and govern ourselves. We're free. When we can reach this state, that's when we'll be released from our enslavement to greed, anger, and delusion—and be truly happy. -Ajaan Lee, "Sowing the Seeds of Freedom," Tricycle, Spring 2008 Read the complete article on tricycle.com. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Buddhist Life in the Capital Paid Member

    Rev. Danny Fisher wonders why Buddhists seem to be underrepresented in Washington; after all, he points out, Buddhists in the US outnumber Hindus and Muslims, and yet while both are represented on Obama’s 25-member Advisory Council on Faith-based and Neighborhood Partnerships, Buddhists are not. Read Danny's piece here. Sharon Salzberg, who holds retreats in Washington, DC frequently, has this to contribute to Buddhist life in the capital: A few years ago, when I first started going to Washington, DC regularly to lead a sitting group, my friend Eileen would take me to a “tourist” site each visit—Arlington National Cemetery, or one of the memorials. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    How does sitting upright help? Sylvia Boorstein answers. Paid Member

    Q: So, how does sitting still, upright, and resisting the temptation to move, focus and clear the mind? A: It is, indeed, a helpful technique. First, holding a styled position requires attention—attention brought to bear on the present situation—and so random thoughts are less likely to distract the mind. Second, the decisiveness in the mind that intends to be awake and present—“I’m doing this now”—also guards against distraction. And third, the mind itself, in a context of simplicity, has the natural tendency to return to ease. (I often think about the snow globes with lovely scenes at their center, scenes hidden from view as long as the “snow” is shaken up. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Pausing when We Eat Paid Member

    Here are some methods for helping yourself to slow down your eating by creating pauses: 1. Pause before beginning the meal. Look at each item of food, taking it in with the eyes. Notice colors, textures, shapes, arrangement on the plate or bowl. 2. Take a moment to say grace. Thank the animals, plants, and people who brought this food to you. Be aware of their gifts as you eat. 3. Begin the meal by pausing to inhale the fragrance of the food. Imagine that you are being nourished by just the smell. 4. Eat food like a wine connoisseur tastes wine. First sniff the food, enjoying the bouquet. Then take a small taste. Roll it around in the mouth, savoring it. What ingredients can you detect? Chew slowly and swallow. Take a sip of water to cleanse the palate. When the mouth is empty of food and flavor, repeat the process. 5. More »