Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Caring for Others Paid Member

    The Buddha has suggested that we are without a mother and father to take care of things for us. Mother Earth, once thought to be all-forgiving and capable of absorbing any abuse we could heap upon her, is not the infinitely benevolent resource we thought she was. As we learn of our own mothers at a certain point of maturity, Mother Earth can and does get worn down by giving and forgiving in the face of our persistent demands. And our Father who is in heaven, though perhaps immensely old and lord over a host of devas (as the Buddhists view him), is nevertheless subject to the laws of karma and is not sufficiently omnipotent to make it all work out for us in the end. If we do not care for one another, who else will care for us? Who among us has the right to say of another, “He is of no use to us?” For better or worse, whether we like it or not, we are all in this together. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    The Happiness Revolution Paid Member

    To be truly happy in this world is a revolutionary act because true happiness depends upon a revolution in ourselves. It is radical change of view that liberates us so that we know who we are most deeply and can acknowledge our enormous ability to love. We are liberated by the truth that every single one of us can take the time and pay attention. That is our birthright. Our own happiness can change history, and it does. - Sharon Salzberg, "Lovingkindness" Did you know that you can join a retreat with Sharon Salzberg right now? Tricycle Online Retreats have begun, and we've launched with Sharon's teachings on Lovingkindness. To hear Sharon's first teaching for free, click here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Facing Fear Paid Member

    Fear is what happens when reality collides with our personal fiction. Our practice is based on expectations—expectations about who we are, why we are practicing, and what our practice should be. As our hope disintegrates, it may be replaced by fear. Our characteristics, personality, all of our beautiful plans and ideas are like snowflakes about to fall on the hot stone of our meditation practice. -Lama Tsony, "Facing Fear," from the Fall 2006 Tricycle. Read the complete article. Did you know that you can join a retreat with Sharon Salzberg right now? Tricycle Online Retreats have begun, and we've launched with Sharon's teachings on Lovingkindness. To hear Sharon's first teaching for free, click here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Just Now Paid Member

    The mind can do wonderful and unexpected things. Meditators who are having a difficult time achieving a peaceful state of mind sometimes start thinking, “Here we go again, another hour of frustration.” But often something strange happens; although they are anticipating failure, they reach a very peaceful meditative state. My first meditation teacher told me that there is no such thing as a bad meditation. He was right. During the difficult meditations you build up your strength, which creates meditation for peace. We may want to spend much time—months or even years—developing just these first two preliminary stages, because if we can reach this point, we have come a long way indeed in our meditation. In that silent awareness of “just now,” we experience much peace, joy, and consequent wisdom. -Ajahn Brahm, "Stepping Towards Enlightenment," from the Fall 2006 Tricycle. More »
  • Tricycle Community 13 comments

    Do people really want to be happy? Paid Member

    In his Guardian review of Raj Patel's The Value of Nothing, a critique of the failures of the free market, political philosopher John Gray doesn't seem to have much hope for Buddhism as a cure for bubble economies. It'd help, he says, if enough people would give up their wants, but he doubts that's about to happen any time soon. If, as the Dalai Lama says, everyone is looking for happiness, they might try giving up the endless pursuit of pleasure and find it. But Gray poses a leading question: Do people really want to be happy? He writes: Oscar Wilde may have been right that people know the price of everything and the value of nothing, a remark [Raj] Patel cites at the start of his book, and which gives him its title. But what is value if it is not price? More »
  • NASCAR Buddhism Paid Member

    You don't normally think of Buddhists as NASCAR fans, but why not? Arlynda Boyer, a lifelong NASCAR aficionado, has been practicing Buddhism for past 15 years. She tells Auto Racing Daily ("Where you get your auto racing news") that she sees plenty of similarities between the Buddha's teachings and the NASCAR lifestyle—both NASCAR drivers and Buddhists, she says, "have to live in the moment." She's even written a book about it: Buddha on the Backstretch: The Spiritual Wisdom of Driving 200mph. More »