Buddhism

  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Wisdom of the West Paid Member

    I think Westerners lack respect for their own spiritual maturity. It’s as though Asia owns spirituality, and we’re these barbarians, beseeching, “Oh, Bhante, please come over and tell us how to live.” But I’ve been to Asia, and they’re just as screwed up as we are. And there’s some real wisdom in our culture; the West has a tradition, too, of compassion and wisdom. And some people who aren’t even religious have it. When I was in Asia I totally did whatever an Asian lay person would do—I have the deepest respect for this tradition—but Asia does not have a monopoly on kindness. In Asia, being a lay person is—from the point of view of meditational practice—considered second-class. I personally think that the monastic life does optimize your possibilities for breaking through to awakening. But it’s by no means a guarantee. Most monasteries are hardly crammed full of enlightened people. But we need a teaching that addresses the lives we actually live. We do need to handle money. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Beginning and End Paid Member

    A lojong (mind-training) slogan, with a comment by Pema Chödrön: Slogan: Two activities: one at the beginning, one at the end. Comment: In the morning when you wake up, you reflect on the day ahead and aspire to use it to keep a wide-open heart and mind. At the end of the day, before going to sleep, you think over what you have done. If you fulfilled your aspiration, even once, rejoice in that. If you went against your aspiration, rejoice that you are able to see what you did and are no longer living in ignorance. This way you will be inspired to go forward with increasing clarity, confidence, and compassion in the days that follow. - Pema Chödrön, "Bite-Sized Buddhism," Tricycle Fall 2007 Read the complete article. Follow us on Twitter and Facebook. More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Mind the Gaps Paid Member

    If you start really paying attention to your own thought process—I’m talking here about the process itself and not just the contents of the individual thoughts that make it up—you’ll notice that thoughts don’t just go on and on continuously. There are little spaces between them. Most of us tend to habitually try and fill these spaces up with more thoughts as fast as we possibly can. But even the best of us can’t fill them all, so there are always little gaps. See, you might say that there are two basic kinds of thought. There are thoughts that pop up unannounced and uninvited in our brains for no reason we’re able to discern. These are just the results of previous thoughts and experiences that have left their traces in the neural pathways of our brains. You can’t do much to stop these, nor should you try. More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    No more mercy for Mackey Paid Member

    Elephant Journal's Buddhist-in-Chief Waylon Lewis was kinder to Whole Foods CEO John Mackey than most. Mackey's Wall St. Journal op-ed slamming "Obama Care" wasn't enough to get Way to join the call to boycott the organic foods giant. Taking a more measured approach, Way argued for tolerance in his Huffington Post blog last August ("Why I Ain't About to Boycott Whole Foods"). But that's all over now. Previously a Mackey defender, Way now writes, "I'm finally losing it, and he's finally losing me." What was Way's tipping point? News that Mackey counts himself among the global warming skeptics. More »
  • Tricycle Community 32 comments

    What planet is Brit Hume living on? Paid Member

    The extent to which he can recover seems to me depends on his faith. He is said to be a Buddhist. I don't think that faith offers the kind of forgiveness and redemption that is offered by the Christian faith. My message to Tiger would, "Tiger, turn to the Christian faith and you can make a total recovery and be a great example to the world." —Brit Hume on Tiger Woods I'd say "Forgive him for he knows not what of what he speaks" but there's nothing to forgive and no one to forgive, and I've probably said too much already. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Mind and Mind Essence Paid Member

    Essence is like the sun itself. The sun’s nature is to shine, to be warm, and to illuminate. In the same way, you should distinguish between mind and mind essence. Mind essence has all three of these qualities. It is the essence of this mind essence that is empty, the nature of this mind essence that is cognizant, and the capacity of this mind essence that is unconfined. The ground is Buddha-nature, which is unmistaken in nature, the basic state of all things. It is the natural state, which is not made by the Buddha, and not created by any ordinary being either. It’s naturally so, all by itself. That is the ultimate truth. Whether a buddha comes into this world or not, the nature of things is still the nature of things. The Buddha is someone who realizes what is true, what actually exists. More »