Buddhism

  • Want to go to China for free? Paid Member

    ...Then follow Himalayan Art Resource's director Jeff Watt as he blogs his way through the Middle Kingdom! Read his daily reports from China's museums, universities and Buddhist temples. From his April 3rd blog post, Yesterday morning we left early to travel to the Dazu Grotto. The Sichuan University provided a car and driver for our use. The grottoes are about 300 kilometers north of Chengdu. Dazu is the name of the city/town closest to the different stone carving grotto sites. Dazu means big foot, or big feet. The plural is not made clear in Chinese for this place name. We ate lunch in the town prior to going to the site which I later learned was actually multiple sites. More »
  • Dartmouth College's Buddhism and Medicine Seminar Paid Member

    Our friends at Dartmouth College and the Upper Valley Zen Center were kind enough to inform us of their upcoming Seminar on Buddhism and Medicine.  It looks like quite an event! BUDDHISM AND MEDICINE Perspectives on Life, Death, and the Healing Arts A Seminar at Dartmouth College, Friday, April 16th, 4:00 pm to Saturday, April 17th 4:30 pm More »
  • Roderick Whitfield Discusses Buddhist Cave Art Paid Member

    As reported by the American Museum of Natural History, As goods and people traveled along the Silk Road, many passed through the oasis city of Dunhuang, China, home to incredible caves that contain a treasure trove of Buddhist art. Roderick Whitfield, professor of Chinese and East Asian art and head of the Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art at the University of London, will discuss some of these fascinating cave murals on March 31 at the Museum. He recently answered a few questions on the subject. Why are the caves near Dunhuang so important today? What can we learn from them? More »
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    Stephen Batchelor’s “Deconstructing Buddhism” Paid Member

    These “Deconstructing Buddhism” talks by Batchelor at the Insight Meditation Center are pretty good. Even if you don’t agree with what he is saying, at least he presents his case clearly. In dismissing the ideas of karma and rebirth as features of ancient Indian civilization not intrinsic to what the Buddha taught, Batchelor points out that Buddhism has reinvented itself everywhere that it’s gone (from Japan to the Himalayas) to suit the needs of the new host culture. Buddhism is not a fixed, static thing, Batchelor argues—it’s more like a living organism. The question now is, what shape will Buddhist teachings take in the West? More »
  • “The Tree of Enlightenment” Paid Member

    As a Buddhist in the West, whether by my close non-Buddhist friends, semi-familiar acquaintances, or complete strangers, I have been asked many times to give a quick “general overview of Buddhism”. People often ask this very casually, as if they expect me to snap my fingers and summarize such a massive body of teachings, traditions, and histories, and voila, now you now about the Dharma! Personally, I find this task to be impossible. More »
  • 'Lama, Patron, Artist' at the Smithsonian Paid Member

    As reported by the Washington Post, There are two things most Westerners think they know about Buddhism: It's the one religion that can accommodate atheists, and one of its goals is to escape the material cycles of this world in favor of an immaterial enlightenment. That's why "Lama, Patron, Artist: The Great Situ Panchen," newly opened at the Smithsonian's Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, may come as a surprise. This landmark show, which was organized by the Rubin Museum for Himalayan art in New York, seems to have a fully religious, god-filled sensibility -- no atheistic doubt in sight -- as expressed through the most deluxe of material goods. More »