Buddhism

  • How the clouds of thinking clear & 6 Words of Sage Advice Paid Member

    Ken McLeod is currently leading a Tricycle Retreat (you can listen to his first talk to "The Way of Freedom" here). Included in his teaching is his translation of Tilopa's Pith Instructions on Mahamudra. (Tilopa is considered the founder of Tibetan Buddhism's Kagyu lineage.) Here's a verse: Mists rise from the earth and vanish into space. They go nowhere, nor do they stay. Likewise, though thoughts arise, Whenever you see your mind, the clouds of thinking clear. More »
  • Surviving the dragon Paid Member

    Tsering Namgyal writes for phayul.com today that Arjia Rinpoche, former tutor to the last Panchen Lama, spoke to the Tibetan community in Minneapolis this week about his book Surviving the Dragon: A Tibetan Lama's Account of 40 Years under Chinese Rule, published earlier this year. Arjia Rinpoche fled Tibet when he was asked to tutor the Panchen Lama's Chinese-appointed successor (the successor the Dalai Lama selected disappeared into Chinese custody in 1995 and hasn't been heard from since). More »
  • The Path of Supreme Optimism Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma: Buddhism is a path of supreme optimism, for one of its basic tenets is that no human life or experience is to be wasted or forgotten, but all should be transformed into a source of wisdom and compassionate living. This is the connotation of the classical statement that sums up the goal of Buddhist life: "Transform delusion into enlightenment." On the everyday level of experience, Shin Buddhists speak of this transformation as "bits of rubble turn into gold." Taitetsu Unno, "Number One Fool" (Spring 2008) Sign up for Daily Dharma here. Read the full article: Number One Fool More »
  • Be a child of illusion Paid Member

    Each Friday, Acharya Judy Lief, teacher in the Shambhala tradition of Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche, comments on one of Atisha's 59 mind-training (Tib. lojong) slogans, which serve as the basis for a complete practice. Following each commentary Judy offers us a weekly practice. Here is Slogan 6 (each slogan provides links to the previous slogans, including a two-part discussion of their history and use in practice). I've been following along each week myself—a good way to stay grounded—rather ungrounded!—in my practice. 6. In postmeditation, be a child of illusion. Practice can be divided into two: meditation and postmeditation. More »
  • Less religion, more practice Paid Member

    The Los Angeles Times reports that Jack Kornfield is in Los Angeles this weekend to give a talk on CG Jung's journals at the Armand Hammer Museum and to lead a three-hour meditation retreat at InsightLA. Kornfield, a psychologist and former Thai monk, has written extensively about Western psychology and Buddhist mindfulness practice. Trudy Goodman, LAInsight's lead teacher, tells the Times, "I feel that Jack has changed Buddhism by being a pioneer for the inclusion of our emotional lives in the practice." More »
  • How many candles on the Buddha's birthday cake? Paid Member

    ... Or how many lamps in the Buddha's birthday tree? Either way, yesterday’s post about Vesak got me wondering: when was the Buddha born? As it turns out, there is a long scholarly discussion on the date of the Buddha’s birth (is anybody surprised?). The traditional date given in most Southeast Asian countries is 624 BCE. Scholars in the West and Asia have long rejected this date and, until recently, have placed the date somewhere between 567-563 BCE. These days, however, and increasing number of scholars place the date of the Buddha’s birth later—some even arguing that it could be up to one hundred years later than previously believed (463 BCE). More »