Buddhism

  • Joan Halifax: On Grief and Buddhism Paid Member

    This dewdrop world Is but a dewdrop world. And yet, and yet— —Issa, Eighteenth-century Japanese poet Roshi Joan Halifax gave a beautiful talk on grieving last week, which is available as a podcast at the Upaya Institute and Zen Center’s website. One of the sources she uses for articulating the experience of grief is the stunning poem above, which she says “opens the hand of grief.” Joan is intimate with grief. It’s plain that she’s made an effort to come to know grief personally through experience, and she encourages others to open up to that experience as well. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    A stroll around the blogs Paid Member

    Barbara's Buddhism Blog features the not-going-anywhere (in both senses of the term) debate over whether parts of Buddhism can be unmoored from the actual religion and used for stress relief and so on. Barbara writes that yes, we can use parts of the Buddha's teachings for stress relief, etc., but let's remember that's not what the Buddha taught. In the comments she writes, "Seriously, if I had to come up with a nonsectarian definition of Buddhism, I’d say practice of the Eightfold Path to fully appreciate the teachings of the Four Noble Truths and thus to realize enlightenment." More »
  • Tricycle Community 37 comments

    Share your thoughts on the Fifth Precept Paid Member

    For the forthcoming issue of Tricycle we're putting together a special section on the fifth precept--refraining from taking intoxicants--and we would love to hear your thoughts. Perspectives on the fifth precept vary a great deal--from those who refrain from any and all drugs and alcohol, to those who interpret the term "intoxicants" more loosely and use psychedelics as part of their Buddhist practice. Where do you fall on this spectrum? Send your comments, questions, stories, and opinions to editorial@tricycle.com or reply directly to this post. Who knows, your answer might end up in next issue's special section! More »
  • Brazilian military police go Zen Paid Member

    If you've seen Pixote (or read newspapers), you probably don't hold Carioca policemen in high regard. But try Espirito Santo, a state in Brazil's southeast, where military police "are developing interpersonal relationship skills, emotional balance and discipline in a Zen Buddhist monastery." You can read more here. If you read Portuguese, you can see it in Globo. And if you don't, you can still watch the video there. More »
  • Celebrating the Return of Khyentse Rinpoche Paid Member

    I am very happy to help spread the news about Dilgo Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche's first visit to the United States this August.  This trip will both serve as a commemoration of the life of Kyabje Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910-1991) on the one-hundredth anniversary of his birth as well as a welcoming of his current incarnation, Khyentse Yangsi, to the United States.  May it be the first of many! More »
  • New book, old bones: Susan Moon at the Tricycle Community Book Club Paid Member

    Starting June 21, join us at the Tricycle Community Book Club where Susan Moon will be leading a discussion on her latest, This is Getting Old: Zen Thoughts on Aging with Humor and Dignity.  The book is a collection of essays broken down into three sections: Cracks in the Mind and Body, Changing Relationships, and In the Realm of the Spirit. We will spend two days (loosely) discussing each section and have a final day to wrap things up. From the Introduction: "Wabi-sabi" is a Japanese expression for the beauty of impermanence, the imperfection of things that are worn and frayed and chipped through use. Objects that are simple and rustic, like an earthenware tea bowl, and objects that show their age and use, like a wooden banister worn smooth by many hands, are beautiful. . . . More »