Buddhism

  • Paintings of the 10th Karmapa Paid Member

    Himalayan Art Resources' Jeff Watt writes: Probably one of the most famous Tibetan contemporary artists of his time was the 10th Karmapa, Choying Dorje (1604-1674). Take a look. More »
  • Recalling Khyentse and Trungpa Rinpoches Paid Member

    This comes via the Newsfeed on the Celebrating the Return! website, which contains information on Khyentse Yangsi Rinpoche's first visit to the US this August: Image: Karma Dzong newspaper records Khyentse Rinpoche's first visit to the US From the Celebrating the Return! newsfeed: More »
  • Angry, angry, angry Paid Member

    From Teabaggers (I never got used to "Tea Partiers" and stick with the name they gave themselves) to television news shriekers to the average Jane and Joe on the street (employed or not), Americans seem pretty testy lately. Just turn on cable or take public transportation—or read the blogs. Whether it's difficulty adjusting to the realities of the new century or to our much-changed role in the world, people are angry. So I thought I'd link to a short piece by Ken McLeod, who wrote on anger, its causes, and its remedies through mind-training (lojong), a practice Acharya Judy Lief writes about regularly for us at tricycle.com. More »
  • Our visit with Her Holiness Shinso Ito Paid Member

    This week, I went with Tricycle's editor and publisher, James Shaheen, to talk to Her Holiness Shinso Ito, the head priest of Shinnyo-en, a Japanese lay Buddhist movement whose global membership numbers about one million. Shinso Ito is the first female priest in her Shingon lineage, from which Shinnyo-en emerged, and has twice presided over ceremonies in the thousand-year-old Daigoji Temple, the oldest building in Kyoto. She is pictured below presenting a statue* made by her father, Shinjo Ito, the founder of Shinnyo-en, to New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg. Her Holiness and Hizzoner were speakers at the 2010 National Conference on Volunteering and Service that took place in New York this week. More »
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    Thich Nhat Hanh on Solitude Paid Member

    Being alone means you are established firmly in the here and the now and you become aware of what is happening in the present moment. You use your mindfulness to become aware of every feeling, every perception you have. You’re aware of what’s happening around you in the sangha, but you’re always with yourself, you don’t lose yourself. That’s the Buddha’s definition of the ideal practice of solitude: not to be caught in the past or carried away by the future, but always to be here, body and mind united, aware of what is happening in the present moment. That is real solitude. - Thich Nhat Hanh, The Heart of the Matter Image: Deer Park Monastery More »