Buddhism

  • Race in the Sangha: Taking the Path Together Paid Member

    In 1992 I was visiting a Buddhist friend, and saw a copy of Beneath a Single Moon: Buddhism in Contemporary American Poetry (Shambhala Publications, 1991) sitting on the table. Intrigued, I picked it up and scanned the table of contents to see which American poets had been selected for inclusion in the anthology’s 358 pages. I remember dropping the book as though it had burnt me. It was an instinctive response, something I didn’t even think about or try to explain to myself at the time. After that I just purposefully forgot the book even existed. More »
  • Miya Ando solo show Mujo (Impermanence) opens today Paid Member

    New York-based emerging artist Miya Ando is debuting her recent work in Mujo (Impermanence), her first solo exhibition at Sundaram Tagore Gallery in New York City. A descendant of Bizen sword-makers, Ando was raised among swordsmiths and Nichiren Buddhist priests in a temple in Okayama, Japan. Combining traditional techniques of her ancestry with modern industrial technology, Ando skillfully transforms sheets of burnished steel and anodized aluminum into ephemeral abstractions suffused with subtle gradations of color. The Mujo show opens today, June 20, with a cocktail reception from 6 – 8pm, and will run through July 20 at the Sundaram Tagore Gallery at 547 West 27th Street, New York. Check out the teaser for our upcoming profile of the artist and her work below: More »
  • Consider the Source: Why is Bodhidharma Credited as the "First Ancestor" of the Chan (Zen) School? Paid Member

    Although Bodhidharma is honored as the “First Ancestor” of Zen Buddhism in China, historians know well that Zen not only preceded Bodhidharma, it was also widely practiced centuries before his arrival. So how did Bodhidharma acquire the honored title of “The First”? The foreign Parthian monk An Shigao is credited with introducing Zen to China in the 2nd century, roughly 300 years before Bodhidharma arrived in China. Plenty of evidence indicates that Zen gained popularity soon thereafter, with historical records indicating that Zen flourished in China’s Northern Liang Dynasty at least 50 years before Bodhidharma came on the scene. More »
  • Consider the Source: Why didn't Chinese Zen dharma halls have Buddhist icons? Paid Member

    In traditional Chinese Zen, the dharma hall had a special status as the place where the Zen master expounded the dharma. It was purposefully separated from the Buddha hall, where statues of the Buddha and other notables provided prominent devotional icons for temple services and visitors. The dharma hall itself, however, was always bare of such figures. Why? More »
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    Consider the Source: Why is the Yellow River yellow (and what does it have to do with Buddhism)? Paid Member

    The Yellow River is an iconic symbol of Chinese civilization. Its yellowness comes from the immense amount of silt it carries from the desert regions in the northwest, where Buddhism entered China via the Silk Road. The sand blown off from those deserts has blanketed the region for millenia, leaving soil that is both fertile and easy to dig. The main result was the civilization’s early farming communities. The easily dug soil from the desert also helped create a great number of caves, which house thirty million Chinese people to this day. More »
  • Buddha Buzz: Steven Seagal and Vladimir Putin Paid Member

    Action film star, orientalist, martial arts expert, and recognized Tibetan Buddhist tulku Steven Seagal reemerged in the media this week after aiding a congressional delegation to Russia. Seagal has long been well connected in Russia, where he’s known to get all buddy-buddy with President Vladimir Putin, an avid martial arts enthusiast. More »