Buddha

  • In Care of Earthly Hands Paid Member

    During the month of December, the Tricycle Book Club is discussing Lin Jensen's Deep Down Things: The Earth in Celebration and Dismay! Look for daily excerpts from the book on the Tricycle Blog to inspire the conversation, which is happening here. From Deep Down Things: More »
  • Sento-kun: Half-Deer, Half-Buddha Boy Paid Member

    A couple of years ago, Sento-kun, a half-deer, half-Buddha boy mascot, was chosen to represent the 1,300th anniversary of Japan's ancient capital being relocated to Nara. At first, the baby-faced boy with antlers (the deer is considered a sacred animal in Nara) was not well-received. Many found it ugly and disrespectful toward Buddha. Now, however, Sento-kun—designed by Satoshi Yabuuchi, a sculptor and professor at Tokyo University of the Arts—is being praised by Nara authorities for the amount of attention that he has brought to the city. More »
  • The Buddha in Fiction: How Should A Person Be? By Sheila Heti Paid Member

    How is the Buddha depicted in fiction? In 10,000 different ways. We'll share some of these different ways with you on the Tricycle Blog as we come across them, as I did this morning on my commute to work reading the Fall 2010 issue of n+1.From How Should A Person Be? by Sheila Heti, when the narrator is looking at at a recent painting done by her friend Margaux: More »
  • Discuss the Lotus Sutra Paid Member

    In the third part of the discussion series, "Buddhist History for Buddhist Practitioners," Princeton's Jacqueline Stone discusses the Lotus Sutra: Q: What is the Lotus Sutra about? In it we read how to hear the sutra, how to preach the sutra, who was gathered to hear it preached, what happened before it was preached, why it is so important, how it was preached in the past, what will happen in the future to those who hear it, and so on. It is like an extravagant preamble to an event that never seems to arrive. A: Some scholars of the Lotus Sutra have noted just that point, and I think it is a fair reading. If we just read the sutra, and set aside later interpretations, one thing we see going on is that the sutra is establishing its own authority. For example, at the beginning the Buddha emerges from meditation and begins to preach spontaneously, and not, as is usually the case, in response to a question. More »
  • The Rebel Buddha Book Tour, coming to a town near to you! Paid Member

    Get ready for the Rebel Buddha Book Tour! Dzogchen Ponlop Rinpoche's new book is the biggest Buddhist book in a long time. The official publication date is November 9th, 2010, but we were lucky enough to receive a shiny new copy in our office today. We'll be covering Rebel Buddha in the Tricycle Book Club at tricycle.com in November, and you can also catch the author in his various stops around the country on the Book Tour, in which Rinpoche will be joined by other western Buddhist figures in a panel discussion. The tour kicks off on November 14 in New York, N.Y. at the Cooper Union's Great Hall. The tour will continue on to Halifax, Toronto and Boulder and will conclude in Seattle. More »
  • Enlightenment is the Three Poisons Paid Member

    James Shaheen and I got to spend some time with Bernie Glassman this weekend at Upaya Zen Center in Santa Fe. He is extremely charismatic, bursting with warm-hearted humor, and fond of jokes. I had recently been glancing through the book The Hazy Moon of Enlightenment and wondered if the sterner "Tetsugen Glassman Sensei" of the 1970s felt like another life to him now. His answer was yes and no, but mostly no. More »