Buddha

  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Video of the magnificent Leshan Buddha Paid Member

    Many thanks to Sharon Saw, who posted the following comment to my earlier post on the Leshan Buddha ("Where is the largest stone carved Buddha in the world?"). Take a look, the footage is great and gives you an idea of how magnificent this millennium-old Chinese homage to Maitreya Buddha truly is: yeah.. there’s a cool youtube video of HE Tsem Tulku Rinpoche at Leshan…there are 2 parts, here’s part 1 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A7DczsOQdz4 and part 2 is at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ORb_T-aijP0 More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    A Buddhist's Guide to Twitter Paid Member

    As someone slow to embrace the Twitter phenomenon, I've approached the site with great caution, and perhaps a touch of suspicion. I often wondered if I could use Twitter without falling victim to my ego and shamelessly indulging in detailing the ins-and-outs of my day, giving a digital voice to my inner monologue. Determined not to be the last person on earth who wasn't "tweeting," I did some research and found the advice of Soren Gordhamer especially helpful. In a recent Huffington Post blog post "If the Buddha Used Twitter..." Gordhamer suggests 5 ways in which the Buddha might have approached Twitter, reminding us that it's not what we tweet but how we live away from our online worlds that really matters: More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Where is the largest stone carved Buddha in the world? Paid Member

    I'd never think to ask myself the question, but the Examiner's Stephanie Sherrill has the answer: The world’s largest stone carved Buddha is located in Leshan, China. This Giant Buddha (also called Dafo) is a 233 feet (71 meters) tall statue of a sitting Maitreya Buddha. This UNESCO World Heritage Site was carved in AD 713 to calm the rivers that run along the feet of Buddha. This Buddha sports "1021 twisted hair buns—each one the size of a table—23ft (7m) long ears and an 18ft (5.6m) nose." And it costs only $10 to visit. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Clark Strand on calling the the Earth to witness Paid Member

    Or was the Earth calling the Buddha to witness?: A legend about the Buddha's enlightenment has profound implications for Green Meditation. According to tradition, on the night of Shakyamuni's awakening, as he sat in deep meditation under the bodhi tree, the tempter Mara assailed him with numerous threats and distractions, including vast armies of demons and seductive dancing girls. When these failed to unseat the aspiring Buddha, as a last ditch effort Mara challenged his right to sit upon "the throne of enlightenment." "Who bears witness to your attainment of Buddhahood?" demanded Mara. In answer, Shakyamuni is said to have reached the fingers of his right hand down to touch the ground. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Mandalas, Jung and the Cosmos Paid Member

    It never gets dull at the Rubin Museum of Art, in New York City. Home to a one of—if not the—most comprehensive collections of Himalayan art, the Rubin never disappoints. This August the museum, housed in what was once Barney's downtown fashion emporium, will begin a three-part "Cosmology series," leading with an exhibit on the history and meaning of the mandala. "The Mandala: The Perfect Circle," opens on August 14th and runs through January 11, 2010. According to Martin Brauer, the museum's chief curator, More »
  • Pico Iyer on the Dalai Lama Paid Member

    Nice blog post on the Dalai Lama by Pico Iyer. Here's a taste: Not long ago, I was traveling with the Dalai Lama across Japan and another journalist came into our bullet-train compartment for an interview. “Your Holiness,” he said, “you have seen so much sorrow and loss in your life. Your people have been killed and your country has been occupied. You have had to worry about the welfare of Tibet every day since you were four years old. How can you always remain so happy and smiling?” "My profession," said the Dalai Lama instantly, as if he hardly had to think about it. Read "The Doctor is Within" here. More »