Buddha

  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    (Updated): The Buddha that won't go away: Picture of the Week Paid Member

    I know, I know, you've heard too much about the biggest Buddha in the world. Some of you aren't convinced, though (read Vern's comment in the last post). So here's a pic that will give you a better sense of scale. Are you convinced? We can't promise it's true; maybe there's another giganta-Buddha out there. Can someone please find a bigger Buddha? It's not gonna be easy. Himalayan Art Resource director Jeff Watt tells us it's "bigger than Bamiyan." But if you do outsize this one, the first to alert us gets a copy of Sharon Salzberg's Unplug. But be warned—Wikipedia tells us: More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Buddhist Intolerance? Paid Member

    Buddhism is often considered a religion of tolerance. In many ways it is. But a particular kind of intolerance develops as we practice: intolerance to suffering. I use the word “intolerance” to be deliberately provocative, to encourage you to reflect on suffering and the issues surrounding it. Taking suffering seriously is an important element of Buddhist practice. To ignore it is to miss a powerful opportunity. Intolerance to suffering motivated the Buddha to find liberation from it. Suffering, a feeling of dissatisfaction with life, motivates people to engage in spiritual practice. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    More on the Biggest Buddha in the World Paid Member

    No, it's not the guy in front. Some time ago I wrote about China's Leshan Buddha, in southern Sichuan, the "biggest Buddha in the world." One reader tipped us off to a video, which gives a better idea of the Buddha's size. Now,  Jeff Watt (Himalayan Art Resource) has posted a picture of himself in front of the famed rock sculpture. You can read more about the Leshan Buddha at "Jeff's Travels." Since posting several weeks back, I've received more Leshan Buddha pix than I can post, but keep them coming, I enjoy them. More »
  • "The Most Important Insight of the Buddha" Paid Member

    I read the following quote this weekend: "The single most important or most basic insight of the historical Buddha is the claim that who we are and what we think exists is a function of our mind and its cognitive powers. In other words, it is our mind and our uses of it that determine how we see and understand our self, the world, and other things." - Stephen J. Laumakis, An Introduction to Buddhist Philosophy This is from a textbook describing Buddhism in relation to competing schools of thought in ancient India, and I suppose I don't really disagree, but something about it rubbed me the wrong way. I guess it's because it's taking Buddhism purely as a philosophy and missing out on the experiential part of practice. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Sit down, rise up! Paid Member

    Ethan Nicthern's One City: A Declaration of Independence will give you a pretty good idea of what his work is all about. Committed to creating a "bridge" between contemplative practice and activism, Nichtern and his organization, the Interdependence Project, have evolved since the book appeared. We've seen the launch of Beliefnet's One City blog and  the growth and increasing visibility of the ID Project, which has recently relaunched its website. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Pear-shaped Buddhas? Paid Member

    No, Buddha-shaped pears! Is someone getting over on us? It's Friday and after a long week I thought I'd pass along the joy. I guess unlike money, Buddhas grow on trees. You can taste the fruit—or at least see it—here. More »