Buddha

  • Want to go to China for free? Paid Member

    ...Then follow Himalayan Art Resource's director Jeff Watt as he blogs his way through the Middle Kingdom! Read his daily reports from China's museums, universities and Buddhist temples. From his April 3rd blog post, Yesterday morning we left early to travel to the Dazu Grotto. The Sichuan University provided a car and driver for our use. The grottoes are about 300 kilometers north of Chengdu. Dazu is the name of the city/town closest to the different stone carving grotto sites. Dazu means big foot, or big feet. The plural is not made clear in Chinese for this place name. We ate lunch in the town prior to going to the site which I later learned was actually multiple sites. More »
  • Roderick Whitfield Discusses Buddhist Cave Art Paid Member

    As reported by the American Museum of Natural History, As goods and people traveled along the Silk Road, many passed through the oasis city of Dunhuang, China, home to incredible caves that contain a treasure trove of Buddhist art. Roderick Whitfield, professor of Chinese and East Asian art and head of the Percival David Foundation of Chinese Art at the University of London, will discuss some of these fascinating cave murals on March 31 at the Museum. He recently answered a few questions on the subject. Why are the caves near Dunhuang so important today? What can we learn from them? More »
  • “The Tree of Enlightenment” Paid Member

    As a Buddhist in the West, whether by my close non-Buddhist friends, semi-familiar acquaintances, or complete strangers, I have been asked many times to give a quick “general overview of Buddhism”. People often ask this very casually, as if they expect me to snap my fingers and summarize such a massive body of teachings, traditions, and histories, and voila, now you now about the Dharma! Personally, I find this task to be impossible. More »
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    (Almost) Daily Words of Wisdom from Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche Paid Member

    One of my favorite newsletters is Carolyn Gimian's "Ocean of Dharma." You can sign up for it here and join nearly 10,000 others who receive jewels of wisdom from Chogyam Trungpa Rinpoche two or three times a week. Here's today's, one I particularly liked: Keep the Moth Out of the Flame When you are trying to help someone, you have to have humor, self-existing humor, and you have to hold the moth in your hand, but not let it go into the flame. That's what helping others means. Ladies and gentlemen, we have so much responsibility. A long time ago, people helped one another in this way. Now people just talk, talk talk. They read books, they listen to music, but they never actually help anyone. They never use their bare hands to save a person from going crazy. We have that responsibility. Somebody has to do it. It turns out to be us. More »
  • NASCAR Buddhism Paid Member

    You don't normally think of Buddhists as NASCAR fans, but why not? Arlynda Boyer, a lifelong NASCAR aficionado, has been practicing Buddhism for past 15 years. She tells Auto Racing Daily ("Where you get your auto racing news") that she sees plenty of similarities between the Buddha's teachings and the NASCAR lifestyle—both NASCAR drivers and Buddhists, she says, "have to live in the moment." She's even written a book about it: Buddha on the Backstretch: The Spiritual Wisdom of Driving 200mph. More »
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    December 8: Celebration of the Buddha's Enlightenment Paid Member

    What to do to celebrate the day that marks the Buddha's enlightenment, or "the Buddha's Big E," as Wild Fox Zen's Dosho Port has it? Here's what Dosho writes before he offers us a ceremony for our home practice: In our tradition, we commemorate the Buddha's Enlightenment Day on December 8th. Zen lore has it that after sitting under the bodhi tree for seven days, the Buddha looked up, saw the morning star and roared his lion's roar, "I together with the great earth and all living beings, attain the Way." You can take part in the do-it-yourself ceremony here. More »