Buddha

  • Traveling Jade Buddha Paid Member

    The Jade Buddha for Universal Peace is an intrepid traveler. The 10-foot (13-1/2 feet on its alabaster throne) 4-ton statue is now sitting pretty in Worcester, Massachusetts (above), in the parking lot of the Linh Son Temple, formerly a single-family home. When its tour of the North America, Europe and Asia is complete, the statue will make it's home at the Great Stupa of Universal Compassion, in Bendigo, Australia. It's official website reads: The purpose of exhibiting the Jade Buddha around the world is for everyone, irrespective of their religion, to take a moment to reflect upon peace; peace for the world; peace in their relationships; peace for their families and friends; peace at work; peace in their mind. More »
  • Happy Birthday, Buddha Paid Member

    . . . and happy enlightenment, and happy passing away. Today many Buddhist countries around the world celebrate Vesak (sometimes called Buddha Purnima or Buddha Jayanti), a holiday that commemorates all three of these major events of the Buddha’s life. It takes place annually at the end of May, when the moon is full. More »
  • What will it take to establish a truly Western Dharma? Paid Member

    In Tricycle’s most recent issue there is a piece titled “It Takes a Saint.” In this piece, Tai Situpa Rinpoche shares his beliefs on what it will take for Buddhism to become truly established in the West.  He writes, "I’ll make it simple: One Western person must attain full enlightenment in the same way as Marpa, Milarepa, or Padmasambhava. If one Westerner—man or woman, doesn’t matter—attains that level of realization, then pure dharma will be established in Western culture, Western language, and environment, and so forth. Until that time, dharma can be taught in the West, which is already happening; it can be practiced in the West, which is already happening; and it can be recited in Western languages. But it’s not yet one hundred percent complete." Read the whole piece here. More »
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    Cyborg Buddha: Is what we are born with enough or could we use a little help? Paid Member

    Suzuki Roshi once said something to the effect of, "You're perfect as you are—and you could use a little work." Transhumanist, bioethicist, and former Buddhist monk James Hughes would agree. And that's an understatement: there's virtually nothing about us, he thinks, that can't be enhanced to improve our chances at realization: More »
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    Nice digs Paid Member

    A Buddhist priest's quarters, situated on the grounds of the 550-year-old Buddhist temple Chushin-ji, by architects Katsuhiro Miyamoto & Associates, as seen at iconeye, where you can read all about it: More »
  • Whose Buddhism is best? Paid Member

    It depends on who you ask. Each school has taken time to assert its superiority by virtue of its "authenticity." In the last issue, Tricycle editor-at-large Andrew Cooper took a historical look at such claims: Traditionally in Buddhism, for a school or doctrine to be regarded as authentic, it must be traceable back to the historical Buddha, Shakyamuni. Most often this has been done through scripture: schools or movements based themselves on particular texts said to be the Buddha’s teachings. This was seldom only a matter of establishing legitimacy; it was usually tied as well to sectarian polemics about superiority. More »