Books

  • Tibetan monks found chanting text by Oxford philosopher Paid Member

    Last week, I blogged about Derek Parfit, an Oxford philosopher featured in a recent issue of The New Yorker. In her article on Parfit, "How to Be Good," Larissa MacFarquhar writes about the apparent affinity between Parfit's view and the Buddhist view of the self. To demonstrate this point MacFarquhar includes a parenthetical anecdote about Tibetan monks chanting lines from Parfit's book, Reasons and Persons. This struck me as fairly remarkable, so I wrote to The New Yorker to try to get the backstory. MacFarquhar put me in touch with Harvard professor of ethics and public health, Dan Wikler, who originally provided her with the story. Quoted below is part of an email that I received from Wikler. More »
  • Practical Matters: How to benefit most from mindfulness practice Paid Member

    We're reading B. Alan Wallace's new book, Minding Closely: The Four Applications of Mindfulness, at the Tricycle Book Club. Join us to discuss both the theory and practice of mindfulness. From Minding Closely: More »
  • 20 Years, 20 Teachings: The Tricycle 20th Anniversary E-book Paid Member

    In a recent blog post, "Tired of hiding? Speak up," I highlighted an exchange between two Tricycle Community Members. This was meant to demonstrate how tricycle.com and Tricycle the print magazine can effectively combine for community building. In his introductory letter to 20 Years, 20 Teachings: The Tricycle 20th Anniversary E-book, Editor & Publisher James Shaheen also writes about how moving online has helped foster a sense of community. He writes: More »
  • At the Tricycle Book Club: Minding Closely with B. Alan Wallace Paid Member

    Join us at the Tricycle Book Club on Monday, September 5 to participate in a discussion with B. Alan Wallace on his new book, Minding Closely: The Four Applications of Mindfulness.In Minding Closely, Wallace presents a simple but powerful set of techniques for anyone—regardless of tradition, beliefs, or lack thereof—to cultivate mindfulness. Beginning with the basics, Wallace (who has studied mindfulness from a variety of perspectives as a monk, scientist, and Buddhist teacher) encourages us to investigate, and meditate on, the challenging issues we face in life. While reading Minding Closely we're reminded continually of the importance of process as we wonder these big questions. From the preface: More »
  • The World Without Us: An interview with Alan Weisman Paid Member

    If you haven't yet downloaded our 20th anniversary e-book, 20 Years, 20 Teachings, there's still time. It's free to Tricycle Supporting and Sustaining Members. In it you will find many of our most popular writers from the past two decades. Most of the featured articles are from Buddhist teachers, but not all. Award-winning environmental journalist Alan Weisman makes an appearance in our e-book. In an interview with Clark Strand, titled after his best selling book, The World Without Us, Weisman speaks about global warming, population control, and what the world would look like without humans. At a time when natural disasters are becoming increasingly common events, this  is even more relevant today than it was when it was published just a few years ago in 2007. More »
  • Fire Monks: A Q&A with Colleen Morton Busch Paid Member

    Colleen Morton Busch is the author of Fire Monks: Zen Mind Meets Wildfire at the Gates of Tassajara. She has practiced in the Soto Zen tradition for many years and currently serves on the board at the Berkeley Zen Center. Fire Monks is featured in the current issue's "Books in Brief." We were recently able to chat over email about Zen, fire, and the relationship between the two. More »