Books

  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Jeff Bridges and Bernie Glassman Paid Member

    The Tricycle staff had a lot of fun last night at the NYC Union Square Barnes & Noble event featuring actor Jeff Bridges, Zen teacher Bernie Glassman, and Tricycle's very own editor and publisher James Shaheen. Jeff and Bernie were there to promote their recently released book The Dude and the Zen Master. If you've seen The Big Lebowski, you know which one is the Dude and which one is the Zen master, although many fans of the cult classic claim that the Dude is a Zen master. The two friends spent five days at Jeff's ranch in Montana doing what they call "jammin'" and what I like to call being on a "bro retreat"—chilling out, talking about life, and smoking cigars. Their conversation was recorded, transcribed, and voilà: The Dude and the Zen Master was born. More »
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    The Haiku Spirit Paid Member

    Stephen Addiss, PhD, is Professor of Art at the University of Richmond in Virginia. Author of The Art of Haiku, one of Tricycle’s picks for “Books in Brief” this issue, Addiss is a prolific scholar-artist who has been practicing Japanese calligraphy and ink painting for over 40 years. He is a true jack-of-all-trades—Addiss also studied music under the tutelage of John Cage and toured internationally for 16 years as part of the folk duo “Addiss & Crofut.” Tricycle’s Emma Varvaloucas spoke with him by phone last month about his recently published book and his thoughts on the “haiku spirit.”   More »
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    If You're Lucky, Your Heart Will Break: Field Notes from a Zen Life Paid Member

    Author and blogger James Ishmael Ford is a dually-appointed Unitarian Universalist minister and Soto Zen Priest. His newest book, If You're Lucky, Your Heart Will Break: Field Notes from a Zen Life, was published by Wisdom Publications in September. The following passage is excerpted from the chapter "Spiritual Directors." More »
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    Looking Back Paid Member

    Today we were pleasantly reminded of the late Zen priest and author Darlene Cohen when we received a beautiful, two-volumed boxed set of The Noisiest Book Review in the Known World: The Best of RALPH: The Review of Arts, Literature, Philosophy and the Humanities, in which our Fall 2005 interview with Cohen is being reprinted. Cohen, who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis, wrote extensively on dealing with chronic pain, both physical and emotional. In her Q&A with Tricycle's features editor Andrew Cooper, her sharp wit really shines through. We thought we'd share a laugh by posting the brief interview in its entirety here: More »
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    Thai Taxi Talismans Paid Member

    Artist Dale Konstanz has been addicted to taking Thai taxis since he moved to Bangkok in 2003. They became not just a way to get around, but an opportunity to chat with the drivers, practice his Thai, and learn about the culture. For his book, Thai Taxi Talismans, Konstanz has compiled the best of his photos of Buddha images, lucky charms, and pop culture paraphernalia that sit on dashboards and dangle from rear-view mirrors in Bangkok cabs. Read an excerpt and look through our slideshow of some of the talismans below: Thai Taxi Talismans More »
  • Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt Paid Member

    Mindfulness in the Garden: Zen Tools for Digging in the Dirt is a new book from Parallax Press by landscape architect and author Zachiah Murray, with a foreword by Thich Nhat Hanh. Predicated upon the Zen conviction that the garden is a perfect place to practice mindfulness, the book offers a series simple short verses, called gathas, to assist us in cultivating deep awareness through the practice of gardening. The following excerpt begins the book. Entering the Garden Entering the gardenI see my true nature.In its reflectionmy heart is at peace. We cross many thresholds in our lives. Some thresholds are monumental—being born, learning to walk, starting school, graduating, getting our first job, losing our first job, getting married, giving birth, and dying. Other thresholds are subtle—moving from one room to another, passing through a gate, or crossing an intersection. More »