Books

  • Tricycle Talks: Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara, Getting Intimate Paid Member

    Tricycle Talks: Now in iTunes More »
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Idleness Waiting Grace Paid Member

    Mark C. Taylor recounts a poignant lover affair not with a person but with a place that, paradoxically, cannot be easily localized. For many years, Taylor has lived in the Berkshire Mountains, where he writes and creates land art and sculpture. In a world of mobile screens a virtual realities, where speed is the measure of success and place is disappearing, his work slows down thought and brings life back to earth to give readers time to ponder the importance of place before it slips away. Idleness More »
  • Tricycle Community 10 comments

    Less is More Paid Member

    We spread thoughts of goodwill for all the world, that we don’t wish anyone any harm. We wish that all beings could find happiness. So why are we sitting here with our eyes closed? Why aren’t we going out there, making people happy? More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Bits of Poetry That Stick Like Burrs Paid Member

    There is a man who travels around the world trying to find places where you can stand still and hear no human sound. It is impossible to feel calm in cities, he believes, because we so rarely hear birdsong there. Our ears evolved to be our warning systems. We are on high alert in places where no birds sing. To live in a city is to be forever flinching. The Buddhists say there are 121 states of consciousness. Of these, only three involve misery or suffering. Most of us spend our time moving back and forth between these three. Blue jays spend every Friday with the devil, the old lady at the park told me. More »
  • Tricycle Talks: Sharon Salzberg & Real Happiness at Work Paid Member

    Tricycle Talks: Now in iTunes More »
  • Tricycle Community 26 comments

    Karmuppance Paid Member

    An excerpt from Ram Dass' Grist for the Mill: Awakening to Oneness. For more in Dass, read "America's Guru: Ram Dass at 82" in the current issue of Tricycle. In the mid-sixties there seemed to be an expectation that if we got high, we’d be free. We were not quite realistic about the profundity of man’s attachments and deep clingings. We thought that if only we knew how to get high the right way, we wouldn’t come down. And that was our attempt. Then in the late sixties, there was the idea that if we joined the movement and became part of a model of how to stay high, we’d be able to do it. So in the late sixties and early seventies, there was a tremendous interest in mass movements. More »