Books

  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Bits of Poetry That Stick Like Burrs Paid Member

    There is a man who travels around the world trying to find places where you can stand still and hear no human sound. It is impossible to feel calm in cities, he believes, because we so rarely hear birdsong there. Our ears evolved to be our warning systems. We are on high alert in places where no birds sing. To live in a city is to be forever flinching. The Buddhists say there are 121 states of consciousness. Of these, only three involve misery or suffering. Most of us spend our time moving back and forth between these three. Blue jays spend every Friday with the devil, the old lady at the park told me. More »
  • Tricycle Talks: Sharon Salzberg & Real Happiness at Work Paid Member

    Tricycle Talks: Now in iTunes More »
  • Tricycle Community 26 comments

    Karmuppance Paid Member

    An excerpt from Ram Dass' Grist for the Mill: Awakening to Oneness. For more in Dass, read "America's Guru: Ram Dass at 82" in the current issue of Tricycle. In the mid-sixties there seemed to be an expectation that if we got high, we’d be free. We were not quite realistic about the profundity of man’s attachments and deep clingings. We thought that if only we knew how to get high the right way, we wouldn’t come down. And that was our attempt. Then in the late sixties, there was the idea that if we joined the movement and became part of a model of how to stay high, we’d be able to do it. So in the late sixties and early seventies, there was a tremendous interest in mass movements. More »
  • Wouldn’t it be better if you practiced the dharma? Paid Member

    Again, an elder was once circumambulating the outer perimeter at Radreng Monastery. Dromtönpa asked him, “O elder, performing circumambulation may be satisfying, but wouldn’t it be better if you practiced the Dharma?” The elder felt that, instead of performing circumambulations, perhaps it would be more effective if he were to read Mahayana sutras, so he began to read sutras on the temple veranda. Dromtönpa then asked him, “Reading sutras might also be satisfying, but wouldn’t it be better if you practiced the Dharma?” The elder took this as a sign that, when contrasted with reading sutras, engaging in meditative absorption is more profitable, so he abandoned reading sutras and sat down with his eyes closed. Again, Dromtönpa asked, “Meditating might also be satisfying, but wouldn’t it be better to practice the Dharma instead?” More »
  • The Committee Paid Member

    The title of your new book is With Each and Every Breath: A Guide to Meditation. Why not the far more popular “mindfulness”? Probably because I’m a contrarian! Really, though, I wanted to put meditation in its larger context, and mindfulness is just one aspect of meditation. It’s not just about getting along better in your daily life; it’s also about your life as a whole. What’s really important to you? What’s not important to you? I’m teaching meditation as way to train the mind to find happiness in all situations and beyond all situations, to think about the higher levels of happiness that meditation can bring. More »
  • Knocking on Heaven's Door: Review & Event Paid Member

    "A Life Too Long" is a heart-wrenching story of terminal illness, modern medicine, and family. The article, adapted from Katy Butler's new book, Knocking on Heaven's Door, was a hit with the Tricycle community. And word is spreading. This week, The New York Times reviewed Butler's new book: More »