Art

  • Lynda Barry in the Times Paid Member

    Not to brag or anything, but I think The New York Times may have a bit of a crush on us. Hot on the heels of columnist Wendy Johnson's profile last week comes an article about artist/author Lynda Barry, whose drawings of meditating monkeys, along with an original essay, are featured in our Summer 2008 issue. More »
  • Philip Glass at the Met Paid Member

    Philip Glass's Satyagraha is at the Metropolitan Opera in New York. Read his Tricycle interview from our Spring 2008 issue here. And A Monk Amok is heading to Korea. More »
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    Philip Whalen and the Bhutanese Bob Dylans Paid Member

    Danny Fisher points us to the Nation's review of The Collected Poems of Philip Whalen. And from the Worst Horse: "a small platoon of Bhutanese Bob Dylans". Ok, sure. More »
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    Japanese Poetry in South Korea Paid Member

    A profile of two Korean poets who were called unpatriotic for practicing Japanese forms of poetry. Like other Koreans who grew up under Japanese colonial rule, from 1910 to 1945, Son and Rhee learned Japanese, rather than Korean, at school. When the Japanese withdrew after their defeat in World War II, many of these Koreans found themselves without a true mother tongue - ashamed to speak Japanese but unable to read Korean well. But unlike others, Rhee and Son maintained their love of Japanese poetry long after the liberation. For that, they paid a price: a lifetime of disregard or disapproval from fellow Koreans. (And North Korea test-fired more missiles. The U.S. More »
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    International Buddhist Film Festival Paid Member

    Shoot, missed the International Buddhist Film Festival in San Francisco (2/14 to 3/6) and so missed all the fine offerings there, including the awesomely titled Meditate and Destroy about Noah Levine, by Blue Lotus Films. We won't forget to mention this year. Ahem! More »
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    Zen Monster Paid Member

    Though the term "Zen Monster" may bring to mind the Buddha-on-Godzilla image from Brad Warner's Sit Down and Shut Up, Zen Monster is actually a new magazine full of politics, religion, criticism, poetry, fiction, book reviews, and art. It's described as "a voice for independent poets, artists and writers outside of any hierarchical or ecclesiastical Buddhist affiliation." It's very pretty, too, thanks to designer Charles Rue Woods, a longtime friend of Tricycle. Contributors to the first issue include Norman Fischer, Philip Whalen, Susan Bee, Ann Waldman, Gary Snyder, and many more. I opened right up to a bunch of Philip Whalen epistles and Eliot Katz's Elegy for Allen Ginsberg, plus a photo of a cool sculpture by Steven Siegel, not to be confused with the smililarly named action star / tulku. More »