Art

  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    Buddhawatch: A thousand Buddhas appear Paid Member

    Wow! Hundreds of Buddha carvings appeared on three cliffs bordering a reservoir in Mei Shan City, Sichuan province. Apparently, they're well enough preserved to discern their different expressions. The reservoir that submerged the Buddhas was apparently built against the wishes of "cultural sectors," according to the People's Daily, which also asserts that water served as a better preservative than air. Buddhatwatch: Post your own favorite Buddhas as comments below and we'll pick a few and put them up. More »
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    Images of the Buddha through 2 millennia Paid Member

    It wasn't until several centuries after he'd come and gone that  representations of the Buddha appeared. Until then, the the Awakened One was represented by his absence—footprints, an umbrella shading an empty throne. Once his image appeared, however, an art form flourished for nearly two millennia and continues to this day. At the new Robert H. N. Ho Family Foundation Gallery of Buddhist Sculpture at London's Victoria and Albert Museum, "47 masterworks, culled from the museum's renowned Asian collections, trace the Buddha's portrayal from the 2nd to 19th centuries, in places as diverse as India, Java and Japan," we read at Time.com. More »
  • Tricycle Community 2 comments

    Buddhawatch Paid Member

    Not quite a Buddha but a Tara in Ensenada, Mexico, which, according to Leslie, "was a gift of peace and friendship from a Nepalese international cultural organization in 1993." Leslie laments the graffiti, which was not there when she visited. You can see it and read about it here. More »
  • Crazy for mandalas Paid Member

    Art critic Holland Cotter of the New York Times loves the Rubin Museum of Art, in New York City. And he's positively exuberant about the museum's current mandala exhibit ("The Mandala: The Perfect Circle" is the first of a series of three), even threatening to camp out at the Chelsea sanctuary for Himalayan art for the rest of the summer and into fall. You'll see what he means if you get a chance to visit for yourself. To read Cotter's review, click here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    We Are All Buddhas Paid Member

    Took this picture in Brooklyn, New York on August 7th with my cell phone. The thing to the right is a heart. More »
  • Exclusive interview with Nati Baratz, director of "Unmistaken Child" Paid Member

    The Fall issue of Tricycle—coming to a newsstand or mailbox near you soon—features a review of the film Unmistaken Child and a short interview with the filmmaker. Below is a lightly longer version of the same conversation, and here's a list of showimes for the film. The film has garnered attention for its unsparing account of the wonders as well as the difficulties of the tulku system. A young monk searches for the reincarnation of his deceased master and finds him in a small boy. The boy is then removed from his family and entered into a life of devotion to the dharma. More »