Art

  • Two Poems by Dan D'Agostino Paid Member

    Last week I posted 2 poems by a writer named Patrice Mason and invited any and all practitioner poets to submit their work to our blog at tricycle@tricycle.com.  This week I am very happy to be share these two pieces by songwriter Dan D'Agostino. The Way of the Wrathful Deities An expert eye for the dark arising For the dancing, whirling, wrathful gods For the cruel streak in the human species For the rot behind the bright façade Will have you marked a sour insurgent The sunlit realm you have betrayed But the wrathful gods are always calling “Approach us now, be not afraid” You do and with their claws they scourge you You’re pinned upon their cross of wrath More »
  • Two Poems by Patrice Mason Paid Member

    I was very happy to find these two poems by Patrice Mason waiting for me in my inbox this morning... To all you practitioner poets, writers, and artists out there, please feel free to submit creative offerings for the blog at tricycle@tricycle.com More »
  • Amid turmoil, Pakistan reaches out to Buddhist tourists Paid Member

    The Guardian's Riazat Butt calls it a case of fiddling while Rome burns: Pakistan reaches out to Buddhists amid allegations that its intelligence service is actively aiding the Taliban while putatively aiding US/Coalition forces in Afghanistan. (The war is of course taking place on Pakistani soil as well, the border region being so nebulous and porous.) UPDATE: A plane crashed in Pakistan today, killing 152 people.) More »
  • Buddhism and the Supernatural Paid Member

    Today's Daily Dharma: There is a widely held misconception in the West that Buddhism was originally a humanistic movement that made no place for gods, goddesses, and spirit beings. This, however, is not the case. Buddhist cosmology from the outset envisioned the Buddha with a host of spirits and divinities who participated in his career and offered support to those on the Buddhist path. While the Buddha transmitted the wisdom and methods whereby his followers could attain enlightenment, he commissioned his supernatural aides to attend to his congregation's immediate needs for well-being and relief from suffering. -Miranda Shaw, "Mothers of Liberation" (Summer 2007) Read the complete article here. More »
  • Tradition Transformed Paid Member

    Contemporary Tibetan art has finally come to New York City. The Rubin Museum is currently hosting "Tradition Transformed: Tibetan Artists Respond," the first ever exhibition of contemporary Tibetan art in NYC. From the Rubin: The exhibition began with an invitation: the nine artists were asked to submit new and recent works that served as the show's formative voice and inspired the curatorial response. Specific works by the same artists were then selected from New York private collections in order to complement the new pieces and highlight each artist's range. More »
  • Coming Soon to the Tricycle Community: A Discussion on the Poems of "the angry monk," Gendun Chopel Paid Member

    Join us at the Tricycle Community Poetry Club from July 26th through August 2nd for a discussion with Professor Donald S. Lopez Jr., the translator and editor of In the Forest of Faded Wisdom: 104 Poems by Gendun Chopel. A highly regarded modern Tibetan poet, Gendun Chopel is also known as "the angry monk." Here is Lopez's commentary on poem number 33. The poem itself is below: More »