Art

  • The Haiku Corner Turns 5-7-5... Paid Member

    Kudos and congratulations to the biggest little discussion group on the Tricycle Community: the Haiku Corner, mindfully minded by our great good friend Gary Gach. Very soon (if it hasn't already) the Haiku Corner's discussion will reach its 575th page (that's nearly 7,000 posts)! Gary tells me that 5-7-5 means something in haiku-speak—who knows. You can visit the Tricycle Community here. You can go directly to the Haiku Corner here, but you need to be a member of the Tricycle Community in order to do that—it's easy to join, and free! Or—contribute your own haiku right here! Thanks again, Gary, and all the crazy wisdom haiku poets contributing to this dialogue! We're very happy you're spinning your sibilant syllables with us! More »
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    More Inklings Paid Member

    We've written before about Dairyu Michael Wenger's wonderful Inklings from his blog of the same name. Here are some more for you, to brighten your August: Koan Solved: More »
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    Two Poems by Patrick Mizelle Paid Member

    Here are two works that recently came across my desk by a fantastic poet named Patrick Mizelle, More »
  • Who hijacked Himalayan art? Or any art, for that matter? Paid Member

    Himalayan Art Resources (HAR) is the most comprehensive collection of Himalayan art available, much of it Buddhist. For years now, Jeff Watt, HAR's director, has been exhorting us to understand and critique Himalayan art on its own merit—much as we might consider, say, a Fra Angelico—and rescue it from the theory-laden university art history departments. For support, Jeff refers us to to an article in yesterday's New York Times, in which Laurence Kantner, an expert in early Italian painting and former curator at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, has this to say: More »
  • Beautiful Buddhas at The Art Institute of Chicago Paid Member

    Earlier this week I had the good fortune to be able to visit The Art Institute of Chicago. While it was fantastic viewing some of the most famous American iconic paintings—like Edward Hopper's Nighthawks and Grant Wood's American Gothic—I was most impressed by some of the beautiful Buddha sculptures. I just didn't expect to find them there, I guess. It was a pleasant surprise. Above is a picture of a 12th century granite Buddha from Tamil Nadu, India. Below is an 8th century Buddha from China. Enjoy! More »