Zen (Chan)

The meditation (dhyana) school originating in China that emphasizes "mind-to-mind transmission"
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    The Fourth Perfection Paid Member

    The perfection of zeal is a pure [mind] that exists in the profound depths of the Way. Advancing without ever slacking off—lying down, sitting, standing, and walking—even if you are gasping for breath, never abandon it.From The Chan Whip Anthology: A Companion to Zen Practice, translated by Jeffrey L. Broughton with Elise Yoko Watanabe. © 2015 Oxford University Press. Reprinted with permission of the publisher. From the Six Perfections Collection Sutra, a Chinese jataka collection that arranges tales of the Buddha’s former lives in accordance with the six perfections (paramitas): giving, morality, patience, effort (zeal), concentration, and wisdom.  More »
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    Mind Control Paid Member

    My life is uncomfortable only when I am not capable of controlling my mind. If I am in charge of my mind, then I can live comfortably even in hell. Do not try to find happiness or comfort outside yourself; instead, you should try to become the commander of your own mind and utilize it at will. The entire universe is in your possession, as is your mind. The richest individuals are those who can lead their minds to their full universal capacity. Happiness or sorrow, wealth or poverty, are all dependent on the mind. Anyone incapable of fully controlling her own mind will experience unfulfilled desires even if she possesses everything in the universe.From Reflections of a Zen Buddhist Nun, by Kim Iryop. Reprinted with permission of the Korean Classics Library. More »
  • Zen Moves Through Paid Member

    Trying to identify an artist’s Zen Buddhist influence is something of a fool's errand—and perhaps an antithetical one. The religion, after all, has a long, proud tradition of underplaying any overt impact it has on an adherent’s life. Ancient master Hiakajo Roshi famously summed up the practice with a rather spare injunction for students to eat when hungry and sleep when tired. Chan master Linji Yixuan, founder of the Rinzai school, echoes the sentiment in his oft-cited koan “If you meet the Buddha on the road, kill him.” Nevertheless, Zen Buddhist artists abound, so it’s tempting to wonder how practice might mingle with craft. More »
  • To the Last Moment Paid Member

    The following is adapted from a talk Myogen Steve Stücky gave at San Francisco Zen Center, where he served as abbot. Stucky passed away from cancer one year ago, the morning prior to New Year’s Day 2014. —Eds.To what shallI liken the world?Moonlight, reflectedIn dewdrops,Shaken from a crane's bill. —Dogen, Zen Master Feeling funny in my mind, Lord,I believe I’m fixin’ to die, fixin’ to die.Feeling funny in my mind, LordI believe I’m fixin’ to dieWell, I don’t mind dyin’,but I hate to hear my children cryin’. More »
  • Drama or Dharma Paid Member

    Decked out in a Santa Claus hat and beard, Shozan Jack Haubner (the pen name of a real Zen monk) speaks about how to bring our practice into our approaching holiday gatherings, how to remain mindful as we are saturated in our (let's admit it: somewhat tense) family relationships, and—most importantly—how to accept what we can’t control. As he points out: “Life as we know it is not how any of us would have designed it.” Happy Holidays from the Tricycle team! More »
  • Fear of Silence Paid Member

    I have the impression that many of us are afraid of silence. We’re always taking in something—text, music, radio, television, or thoughts—to occupy the space. If quiet and space are so important for our happiness, why don’t we make more room for them in our lives? One of my longtime students has a partner who is very kind, a good listener, and not overly talkative; but at home her partner always needs to have the radio or TV on, and he likes a newspaper in front of him while he sits and eats his breakfast. More »