Zen (Chan)

The meditation (dhyana) school originating in China that emphasizes "mind-to-mind transmission"
  • Tricycle Community 6 comments

    Sexual Misconduct Paid Member

    Author Nancy Baker is currently leading a Tricycle community discussion about sexual misconduct and the third Zen precept. You can join the discussion here. More »
  • Tricycle Community 11 comments

    Participate Fully Paid Member

    When we just function, just act, just work, with no idea of a “me” that is functioning or acting or working, the dharma is fully expressed, for then there is no separation. Although things are accomplished in the relative sense (cause and effect), there are no results in the absolute sense (no cause and no effect), for functioning is simply the pure expression of that which we call “it” or “thusness.” This is one of the most difficult truths to grasp, much less to carry out, and it is why work practice is such an essential part of Zen training. More »
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    Aging as a Spiritual Practice: How to Grow Older and Wiser Paid Member

    This retreat is intended for people looking for ways to navigate aging's various challenges and rewards. The older we get the more we come to experience the inevitable Buddhist truth of change, and for many of us this can be a difficult process. In this retreat, Richmond goes through the four key stages of aging: 1) Lightning Strikes (the moment we truly wake up to our aging), 2) Coming to Terms (comparing ourselves to how we once were), 3) Adaptation (letting go of who we were and embracing who we are), and 4) Appreciation (acknowledging that "this is my life, I have no other"). Regardless of whether you are enjoying growing old, hating it, or in denial, Richmond offers us all an inner road map for aging. More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    Giving Through Relationships Paid Member

    From Chapter 13 of past Tricycle Retreat leader Ezra Bayda’s new book, Beyond Happiness, The Zen Way to True Contentment: We often look to relationships as a source of our personal happiness. Our relationships with our partners, friends, and family can certainly be enjoyable, and they enrich many dimensions of living. However, much of our unhappiness in life also comes from relationships; and strangely, even though relationships play a huge role in our lives, we are often very much in the dark when it comes to knowing why so much unhappiness is associated with them. Nor do we have a clear idea what to do about it. More »
  • Tricycle Community 21 comments

    Aging as a Spiritual Practice Paid Member

    A student once asked Shunryu Suzuki, “Why do we meditate?” “So you can enjoy your old age,” the Zen master answered. In his 20s when he listened to the exchange, Lewis Richmond, Soto Zen Priest in Suzuki Roshi’s lineage, has had plenty of time to reflect on his teacher’s answer since. “It’s taken me a long time to get past the surface of that answer. I’m now pretty much the age he was when he said that, and it ain’t easy getting old!” Yet in his most recent book, Aging as a Spiritual Practice, Richmond sees in aging great opportunities for spiritual growth. In this interview, conducted at Richmond’s home in Mill Valley, California, I sat down with him to discuss the opportunities and insights aging offers. —James Shaheen More »
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    Zen and the Art Paid Member

    For better or worse, “Zen and the Art of…” has become a phrase that, like “Catch-22,” gets bandied about in all kinds of contexts. Zen and the Art of Changing Diapers, Zen and the Art of Casino Gaming, Zen and the Art of Faking It—there are now literally hundreds of books with “Zen and the Art of…” in the title, all presumably taking their cue from Robert Pirsig’s huge 1970s bestseller, Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Likewise, hundreds of articles—even scholarly ones—appear under the same banner: “Zen and the Art of Medical Image Registration,” “Zen and the Art of Policy Analysis,” and so on. More »