Zen (Chan)

The meditation (dhyana) school originating in China that emphasizes "mind-to-mind transmission"
  • Tricycle Community 4 comments

    Finding Your Place Paid Member

    A fish swims in the ocean, and no matter how far it swims there is no end to the water. A bird flies in the sky, and no matter how far it flies there is no end to the sky. However, the fish and the bird have never left their elements. When their activity is large their field is large. When their need is small their field is small. Thus, each of them totally covers its full range, and each of them totally experiences its realm. If the bird leaves the air, it will die at once. If the fish leaves the water, it will die at once.Know that water is life and air is life. The bird is life and the fish is life. Life must be the bird and life must be the fish.Besides this, further steps can be taken. Thus there are practice and enlightenment, which encompass both eternal life and limited life. More »
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    The Three Refuges Paid Member

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    Introduction to the Precepts Paid Member

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    The Precepts as Practice Paid Member

    Roshi Bodhin Kjolhede of Rochester Zen Center leads us in this retreat about the Precepts, guides to Buddhist morality. The dharma rests on meditation, wisdom, and morality—the three-legged stool of practice, as Kjolhede calls it—and while wisdom and meditation are always in demand in the West, morality tends to get short shrift. But morality is not just something to keep vaguely in mind—doing the hard work of living right—following the Precepts—is doing the dharma, just as much as sitting on the cushion or studying sutras. In this retreat, Roshi Kjolhede will guide us through the Three Refuges, the Three General Resolutions, and the Ten Cardinal Precepts, which together compreise the Precepts as commonly understood in Zen Buddhism. The retreat begins January 2nd, 2012. More »
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    Spacious, Nothing Special Paid Member

    What was most remarkable about Charlotte Joko Beck was her spaciousness. Being with her was sharing this spaciousness, which is ours - though we often miss it. Joko translated this into practice to allow others to taste it and see what attachments and self-centeredness were hindering and obscuring this. Though some got caught up in particular methods of working with clinging and emotional reactions, Joko encouraged observing, noticing reactions and bodily experiencing to “pop” into the present. More »
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    Pain, Passion, and the Precepts Paid Member

    If you’re looking to rest your practice on anything (other than Nothing), you can’t do better than Buddhism’s three essentials: meditation (dhyana), wisdom (prajna), and morality (shila)—the three-legged stool of practice. The meditation component has always been well covered in Western Buddhism. Probably for most practitioners in the Americas and Europe it’s become all but synonymous with practice. And the promise of prajna, the transcendental wisdom revealed through awakening, has stirred the minds of practitioners ever since Shakyamuni looked up at the morning star from beneath the Bodhi tree. More »