The path and practice of insight through mindfulness meditation
  • Tricycle Community 13 comments

    When the Student is Ready, the Teacher Bites Paid Member

    Some years ago, my first Buddhist teacher got permission for me to do a retreat in Korea that is usually attended only by monks. I was the only layperson there, an American at that, and we took a vow not to move while sitting. There was a great deal of ego involved. I felt as if I were sitting there holding the flag. The official American meditator of the Olympic games.At the beginning of one morning sitting, after the first minute or so, I was bitten by a mosquito. This is a rather ordinary event, but it marked a major turning point in my practice. I am actually deeply grateful to that Korean mosquito. She was just doing her job, of course. She was being a mosquito. But the bite really started to itch. I didn’t think I could stand it. There I sat, with 58 minutes between me and the opportunity to scratch. More »
  • Tricycle Community 3 comments

    Exercise: Movement Meditation Paid Member

    You can fully experience movement as an object of meditation by focusing on the sensations arising in the body from the movement. If working with the breath or walking meditation is difficult for you, this meditation offers another opportunity to cultivate mindfulness.Begin by acknowledging your intention to cultivate mindfulness through this practice. More »
  • Tricycle Community 12 comments

    How Long Is A Moment Paid Member

    IN THE PRACTICE OF VIPASSANA we try to stay in "the present moment." Everyone knows what the "present" means: Now. But what, precisely, is a "moment"? How long does it last? And when does the present moment become the past? In Vipassana the word "moment" has two definitions. The first could be called the "practice-moment." ("Practice" refers, of course, to meditation practice.) The second is the moment of consciousness itself. More »
  • Tricycle Community 28 comments

    Skillful Speech Paid Member

    Years ago, when I began traveling the Buddha’s path, I was surprised by the emphasis placed on the practice of skillful speech. The Buddha considered the way we communicate with each other to be so important that he taught the practice of skillful speech alongside such lofty teachings as skillful view, thinking, action, and mindfulness as a pillar of the Ennobling Eightfold Way. The Buddha saw that we are always engaged in relationships, starting with that most significant relationship: the one with ourselves. On the cushion we notice how we speak to ourselves—sometimes with compassion, sometimes with judgment or impatience. Our words are a powerful medium with which we can bring happiness or cause suffering. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    31 Flavors of Craving Paid Member

  • Tricycle Community 24 comments

    Equanimity in Every Bite Paid Member

    NEITHER the coarse feeling of unpleasantness nor the agitated feeling of pleasure, equanimity, the Buddha said, is one of the highest kinds of happiness, beyond compare with mere pleasant feelings. Superior to delight and joy, true equanimity remains undisturbed as events change from hot to cold, from bitter to sweet, from easy to difficult. This neutral feeling is so subtle that it can be difficult to discern. More »