Tibetan

The Tantric Buddhism of the Himalayas; its best-known teacher is the Dalai Lama
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    37 Practices of the Bodhisattva, Verse 1 Paid Member

    Right now, you have a good boat, fully equipped and available—hard to find. To free others and you from the sea of samsara, Day and night, fully alert and present, Study, reflect, and meditate—this is the practice of a bodhisattva. Commentary By Ken McLeod More »
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    Buddhist Training for Modern Life Paid Member

    Segyu Rinpoche is not your typical Tibetan monk. Born to Brazilian parents in Rio de Janeiro, he trained as an electrical engineer before becoming a master healer in Brazil’s rich healing tradition. Later drawn to the Tibetan Buddhist tradition, he studied for 25 years under the guidance of Gelug master Kyabje Lati Rinpoche (1922–2010), former abbot of Tibet’s Gaden Shartse Monastery. In 1983, shortly after arriving in the United States, he was recognized by the head of the Gelug school as holder of the Tibetan Buddhist lineage known as the Segyu. More »
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    Into the Demon's Mouth Paid Member

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    Creating Space Paid Member

    These days we have so many things to think about: our health, our family, our work, our dharma practice. When we don’t know how to deal with them, these worries can make our minds start to slowly shrink, becoming more and more narrow, and as a consequence more and more negative. Sometimes things start to overwhelm us and we feel trapped physically. A small problem can come to seem so big that we can’t deal with it at all. A good way to deal with this is to create space mentally. It helps relieve the tension and uptightness in your mind and in your body as well. Creating space is a very simple method. This is a technique we can apply to give ourselves space and freedom and relief from all our worrisome thoughts. More »
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    On the Contagious Power of Presence Paid Member

    Being present is based on the cultivation of mindfulness in whatever we do. Through mindfulness, we develop greater composure and a heightened sensitivity to nonverbal communication. Then, to the extent that we ourselves are present, we can radiate that same quality outward to the people around us. It is hard to be generous, disciplined, or patient if we are not fully present. If we are present and attentive, and our mind is flexible, we are more receptive to the environment around us. When we are working with the dying, this ability to pick up on the environment is invaluable. The more present we are, the more we can tune in to what is happening. At the same time, that quality of presence is contagious. The dying person picks up on it. The people around him pick up on it. Presence is a powerful force. It settles the environment so that people can begin to relax. More »
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    37 Practices of the Bodhisattva - Verse 12 Paid Member

    Ken McLeod continues his commentary on the 37 Practices of the Bodhisattva with the 12th verse. Watch the other videos here. 12 Even if someone, driven by desperate want, Steals, or makes someone else steal, everything you own, Dedicate to him your body, your wealth, and All the good you’ve ever done or will do — this is the practice of a bodhisattva. How do you honor your hurt while still forgiving the wrongdoer who inflicted it? For more of Ken McLeod's teachings, visit Unfettered Mind. Homepage image: KateWares More »