Tibetan

The Tantric Buddhism of the Himalayas; its best-known teacher is the Dalai Lama
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    Yungchen Llamo Paid Member

    THERE IS A SAYING in Tibet that a beautiful voice can make a wild animal stop dead in its tracks and listen. Such a voice, and its pacifying potential, are the Tibetan singer Yungchen Lhamo's karma. A few days after her birth, her mother presented her to a lama who named her “Goddess of Song”. For much of her life, though, singing was just an occasional luxury. Eight years ago, she fled Chinese-occupied Tibet, trekked across the Himalayas, and arrived half-dead in Dharamsala with a single-minded quest: to see his Holiness the Dalai Lama and study the dharma. Today, she has a stunning record, “Tibet, Tibet,” on Peter Gabriel’s Real World label, and a blessing from His Holiness: To fulfill her Bodhisattva Vows, he told her, she must use her voice to help spread some understanding and appreciation of Tibetan culture, as China does its best to stamp it out. More »
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    The Diamond Cutter Paid Member

    The Diamond Cutter: The Buddha on Strategies for Managing Your Business and Your LifeGeshe Michael RoachDoubleday, 2000228 pp.; $21.95 (cloth)  Michael Roach is the first American to complete the twenty years of rigorous study and examinations it takes to earn the ancient degree of Geshe, or Master of Buddhist Learning, in the Tibetan tradition. He founded and directs the Asian Classics Institute in New York, and under the aegis of his Asian Classics Input Project some 150,000 pages of wood-block manuscripts—carried out of Tibet by refugees in the wake of the destruction of Tibetan libraries—have been transliterated and transcribed into digital databases. He also happens to know business down to its bones. While he was formally studying Tibetan Buddhist teachings, Geshe Michael was also helping to develop one of the world's largest diamond and jewelry firms, Andin International Diamond Corporation. More »
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    Tulkus in Training Paid Member

    According to the Tibetan world view, highly evolved adepts are reborn as tulkus—children who embody a developed capacity for spiritual attainment. The search for such a gifted child is based either on the precise instructions left by the deceased, or on the signs inspired by dreams and visions, and from the intuitions of other great lamas. Tulkus are only fully recognized as such at the age of two or three years old. They are commonly enthroned at the age of four or five and usually do not enter a monastery until they are six years old. Each tulku receives a private education by one of two tutors. The child may be brought up with other tulkus but the rules vary according to each monastery. Tulkus, even as children, are given the honorific title of "Rinpoche," which means "precious one." More »
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    The Four Immeasurables Paid Member

    Buddhism teaches that there is no such thing as the self as we think we know it: a separate, bounded self, strictly cordoned off from what is “other.” When we are freed from the reactive patterns sprung from the boundaries we live by—good and bad; love and hate—we are not the self we were before. And when the boundaries themselves dissolve, self as we understand it disappears. More »
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    What to Do When the Anger Gets Hot Paid Member

    Americans think it is beneficial to “get in touch with” their anger. That’s just the first step—recognizing your anger. The second step is analyzing and meditating on your anger. The tradition to which I belong [Gelugpa] teaches that analytical meditation must be combined with concentration meditation. So analyzing your thoughts, your ideas, your emotions, is absolutely important. With this you recognize what is really hatred, what is really anger. You’re going deeper and recognizing that “I am angry, I am hating.” More »
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    The Shining Shining Path Paid Member

    The Shining Shining PathCarroll Dale ShortBlack Belt Press: Montgomery, Alabama, 1995.400 pp.,$25.00 (cloth). Like light, Buddhism is refracted by the cultures it passes through, emerging in a  rainbow of forms, yet retaining its essential nature. The same holds for Buddhist art and literature, which varies from sumi-e ink painting in Japan to the elaborately colorful images of Tibetan thanka paintings. As Buddhism continues in its slow passage through American culture, what forms will its an and literature take? The Beastie Boys have already given us Buddhist rap. Will we now see Buddhist mysteries, Buddhist space operas, potboiling Buddhist romans à clef? More »