Tibetan

The Tantric Buddhism of the Himalayas; its best-known teacher is the Dalai Lama
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    Tulkus in Training Paid Member

    According to the Tibetan world view, highly evolved adepts are reborn as tulkus—children who embody a developed capacity for spiritual attainment. The search for such a gifted child is based either on the precise instructions left by the deceased, or on the signs inspired by dreams and visions, and from the intuitions of other great lamas. Tulkus are only fully recognized as such at the age of two or three years old. They are commonly enthroned at the age of four or five and usually do not enter a monastery until they are six years old. Each tulku receives a private education by one of two tutors. The child may be brought up with other tulkus but the rules vary according to each monastery. Tulkus, even as children, are given the honorific title of "Rinpoche," which means "precious one." More »
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    The Four Immeasurables Paid Member

    Buddhism teaches that there is no such thing as the self as we think we know it: a separate, bounded self, strictly cordoned off from what is “other.” When we are freed from the reactive patterns sprung from the boundaries we live by—good and bad; love and hate—we are not the self we were before. And when the boundaries themselves dissolve, self as we understand it disappears. More »
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    What to Do When the Anger Gets Hot Paid Member

    Americans think it is beneficial to “get in touch with” their anger. That’s just the first step—recognizing your anger. The second step is analyzing and meditating on your anger. The tradition to which I belong [Gelugpa] teaches that analytical meditation must be combined with concentration meditation. So analyzing your thoughts, your ideas, your emotions, is absolutely important. With this you recognize what is really hatred, what is really anger. You’re going deeper and recognizing that “I am angry, I am hating.” More »
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    The Shining Shining Path Paid Member

    The Shining Shining PathCarroll Dale ShortBlack Belt Press: Montgomery, Alabama, 1995.400 pp.,$25.00 (cloth). Like light, Buddhism is refracted by the cultures it passes through, emerging in a  rainbow of forms, yet retaining its essential nature. The same holds for Buddhist art and literature, which varies from sumi-e ink painting in Japan to the elaborately colorful images of Tibetan thanka paintings. As Buddhism continues in its slow passage through American culture, what forms will its an and literature take? The Beastie Boys have already given us Buddhist rap. Will we now see Buddhist mysteries, Buddhist space operas, potboiling Buddhist romans à clef? More »
  • Mipham Chokyi Lodro, the 14th Shamarpa, Dies at 61 Paid Member

    Shamar Rinpoche passed away suddenly this morning in his center in Renchen Ulm, Germany, at the age of 61. The 14th Shamarpa, Mipham Chokyi Lodro, was born in Tibet and recognized and enthroned there by his uncle, the 16th Gyalwa Karmapa, supreme head of the Karma Kagyu lineage of Tibetan Buddhism. More »
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    Visible & Invisible Paid Member

    MUCH INK HAS BEEN SPILLED in recent years over the question of what con­stitutes genuine "American Bud­dhism." ls it the Buddhism of recent European­ American converts, or the generations-old tradi­tion into which many Americans of Asian ances­try were born? ls it a matter primarily of ideas or of practice? ls it meditative, devotional, or both? Must one be a member of a specific organization to be counted as a Buddhist, or should "free­lancers" be included as well? In short, are there any criteria at all for defining ''American Bud­dhism," and precisely who should be included in the picture? More »