Tibetan

The Tantric Buddhism of the Himalayas; its best-known teacher is the Dalai Lama
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Creating Space Paid Member

    These days we have so many things to think about: our health, our family, our work, our dharma practice. When we don’t know how to deal with them, these worries can make our minds start to slowly shrink, becoming more and more narrow, and as a consequence more and more negative. Sometimes things start to overwhelm us and we feel trapped physically. A small problem can come to seem so big that we can’t deal with it at all. A good way to deal with this is to create space mentally. It helps relieve the tension and uptightness in your mind and in your body as well. Creating space is a very simple method. This is a technique we can apply to give ourselves space and freedom and relief from all our worrisome thoughts. More »
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    On the Contagious Power of Presence Paid Member

    Being present is based on the cultivation of mindfulness in whatever we do. Through mindfulness, we develop greater composure and a heightened sensitivity to nonverbal communication. Then, to the extent that we ourselves are present, we can radiate that same quality outward to the people around us. It is hard to be generous, disciplined, or patient if we are not fully present. If we are present and attentive, and our mind is flexible, we are more receptive to the environment around us. When we are working with the dying, this ability to pick up on the environment is invaluable. The more present we are, the more we can tune in to what is happening. At the same time, that quality of presence is contagious. The dying person picks up on it. The people around him pick up on it. Presence is a powerful force. It settles the environment so that people can begin to relax. More »
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    37 Practices of the Bodhisattva - Verse 12 Paid Member

    Ken McLeod continues his commentary on the 37 Practices of the Bodhisattva with the 12th verse. Watch the other videos here. 12 Even if someone, driven by desperate want, Steals, or makes someone else steal, everything you own, Dedicate to him your body, your wealth, and All the good you’ve ever done or will do — this is the practice of a bodhisattva. How do you honor your hurt while still forgiving the wrongdoer who inflicted it? For more of Ken McLeod's teachings, visit Unfettered Mind. Homepage image: KateWares More »
  • Tricycle Community 8 comments

    37 Practices of the Bodhisattva - Verse 11 Paid Member

    Ken McLeod continues his commentary on the 37 Practices of the Bodhisattva with Verse 11. Watch the other videos here. 11All suffering comes from wanting your own happiness. Complete awakening arises from the intention to help others. So, exchange completely your happiness For the suffering of others — this is the practice of a bodhisattva. What does "having a relationship with everything that arises in experience" mean to you? How do we go about achieving it? For more of Ken McLeod's teachings, visit Unfettered Mind. More »
  • Tricycle Community 7 comments

    Stepping into Groundlessness Paid Member

    Pema Chödrön is a spiritual icon and one of the most influential and recognizable Buddhists in the world. A bestselling author and prolific teacher, she has touched the lives of countless individuals and in turn is fervently adored by many people, and not just Buddhists. But the Pema I am drawn to—and I imagine most Pema Chödrön fans out there feel the same way—is not just a celebrity, but a real-world Buddhist nun who works with her mind and doesn't sugarcoat the truth. Genuine, playful, kind, and humble, the secret to Pema's success seems to be that she has no secret. She is able to help people work with fear and confusion because she has worked with her own fear and confusion. There's no wizard behind the curtain. There's just Pema, and she's practicing just as we can. More »
  • Tricycle Community 5 comments

    37 Practices of the Bodhisattva - Verse 10 Paid Member

    Ken McLeod continues his commentary on the 37 Practices of the Bodhisattva with the tenth verse. Watch the other videos here. 10 If all your mothers, who love you, Suffer for time without beginning, how can you be happy? To free limitless sentient beings, Give rise to awakening mind — this is the practice of a bodhisattva. Think about your relationships and the other difficult things—feelings, memories, situations—that recur in life. Take a moment and picture yourself free of these things. What happens? For more of Ken McLeod's teachings, visit Unfettered Mind. More »