Tibetan

The Tantric Buddhism of the Himalayas; its best-known teacher is the Dalai Lama
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    An Investigation of the Mind Paid Member

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    Surya Says Paid Member

    Truth telling is a rigorous spiritual practice.Buddha's not pretending.We can't just believe whatever we think. We think, therefore, we err.That which we call "I" is just impermanent, ownerless karma rolling along. Don't take it personally. Everyone is a little crazy. Remembering this helps us lighten up.We need a spiritual life, not just special experiences. Grasping fleeting things too tightly gives us rope burn.Awareness practice helps us become more transparent to ourselves.Resistance is another form of clinging.Practice being there while getting there.From Words of Wisdom, © 2008 by Lama Surya Das. Reprinted with the permission of Koa Books, koabooks.comImage: © James A. Menges, www.lifestyleartproject.com More »
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    The Path of Faith and the Path of Reasoning Paid Member

    Translated by Ari Goldfield Illustrations by Mark Lazenby More »
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    The Day After You Die Paid Member

    Even if resembling, while alive, the    children of the gods,Once dead they are more frightful than a    demon horde;People of Tingri, you’ve been deceived by    these illusory bodies. More »
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    Everyone as a Friend Paid Member

    So how should we view sentient beings? If they have all been in every possible relationship with us from time without beginning (and time has no beginning in Buddhism), should we consider them to be enemies? Everyone has indeed been the enemy—the person who wants me to trip, fall down the stairs, break a leg. My first teacher, Geshe Wangyal, said that one problem with this outlook would be that you’d have to go out and kill everybody. Difficult to do. Everyone has also been neutral, like the many people we pass on the streets; we may even know some faces, but we don’t have any open relationship with them. They are just people working here or there; we may see them often, but there is neither desire nor hatred. Should we consider them to be neutral? Or should we consider these people to be friends? More »