Tibetan

The Tantric Buddhism of the Himalayas; its best-known teacher is the Dalai Lama
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    The Third Sparrow Paid Member

    Prayer flags drifted on the wind like long strands of kelp in a current. The sun sank low and orange in the west. The trip was ending? No, couldn’t be. Impossible. Sophia and I walked our clockwise circles, again and again, not really believing that in a handful of hours a plane would rise from the Kathmandu Valley and we’d be on it. We’d been traveling in Nepal for five weeks, through sweaty jungles and mountains bright with snow and claustrophobic markets where old, hunched men sold metal beads, spices, cheap digital watches, hunks of raw water buffalo. There’d been elephants, monkeys, a man-eating tiger, and a moonlit horse nuzzling our tent with his big velvety nose. Countless children asking for chocolate. A gorgeous one-eyed woman. More »
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    The Squirrel Sutra Paid Member

    Walking to the water troughI stopped to see a squirrel stop,a red squirrel drinking at the tap. Hearing me it climbed the firstthin branches of a pine, then lookedto see if I was any kind of threat. And as I stood, a blackcap settledon a branch, then hummingbird-likeseemed to stop midair while the Yellow King with his hordeof hungry ghosts, the White Kingsurrounded by celestial musicians, More »
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    Forget Happiness Paid Member

    The happiness of the three worlds disappears in a moment,Like a dewdrop on a blade of grass.The highest level of freedom is one that never changes.Aim for this—this is the practice of a bodhisattva. The pursuit of happiness for its own sake is a fool’s errand. As a goal it is frivolous and unrealistic—frivolous because happiness is a transient state dependent on many conditions, and unrealistic because life is unpredictable and pain may arise at any time. More »
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    The Dream Team Paid Member

    We used to say that the first three-year retreat was like being put through the washer—heavy-soil program—and the second was like being hung out to dry. Scrubbing out the stains using Vajrayana enzymes; billowing and bleaching under the equanimous sun of blessing. Most of the people I know who have spent time in retreat agree: in the beginning, you don’t really know what you’re getting yourself into. You underestimate how much of the “work” has to do with relating to your shadows alone in your practice space and in relationships with your fellow retreatants. You also tend to underestimate the tenacity of those stains, deep-rooted emotional issues, and subjective misconceptions. More »
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    Looking into the Eyes of a Master Paid Member

    Last winter, on a chilly night just after the New Year, I sat in a darkened theater at the Rubin Museum of Art in Manhattan watching Crazy Wisdom, a documentary about the life of Chögyam Trungpa Rinpoche. Like most American Buddhists, I had heard the colorful stories about his unconventional, theatrical pedagogy—known as “crazy wisdom”—and more than a few anecdotes about his relationships to alcohol and women. I was curious to learn more about this legendary teacher who had influenced so many Western Buddhists, some who have become important teachers in their own right. More »