Tibetan

The Tantric Buddhism of the Himalayas; its best-known teacher is the Dalai Lama
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    No Problem Paid Member

    Fundamentally, there is no problem in life, because everything that happens is actually part of the human journey and human awakening, and all of it is leading us deeper and deeper into reality.From Darkness Before Dawn: Redefining the Journey Through Depression, edited by Tami Simon. Reprinted with permission of Sounds True. Reginald A. Ray, PhD, is an American Tibetan Buddhist teacher. Illustration by Roberto La Forgia More »
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    The Self-Confidence of a Bodhisattva Paid Member

    Hearing about bodhisattvas’ ability to cherish others more than themselves, we may doubt, “If I abandon all self-interest and only cherish others, I will neglect myself and my suffering will increase.” Cherishing others does not mean ignoring our own needs and caring only for others. If we did that, we would fall into a deplorable state in which benefiting others and practicing the dharma would be nearly impossible. In that case, instead of our helping others, they would need to take care of us! More »
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    About Oneself Paid Member

    Hiding one’s faults within, although they are as huge as a mountain, One exposes and condemns others’ faults, although they are as small as a sesame seed. Without having even the slightest good quality, one acts as if one is noble. Named a Dharma practitioner, all one does is against Dharma. Sublime Guru, you who know, please swiftly look upon me with compassion. Bless me to pacify my pride and selfishness.From The Sole Panacea, by Thinley Norbu Rinpoche © 2013 by the Estate of Kyabje Thinley Norbu Rinpoche. Reprinted with permission of Shambhala Publications. www.shambhala.com. Thinley Norbu Rinpoche (1931–2011) was a preeminent modern-day Tibetan Buddhist teacher in the Nyingma lineage. More »
  • The Dalai Lama on What People Get Wrong about the Present Moment Paid Member

    Many Tricycle subscribers will be familiar with the clip below from Sunrise/Sunset, which screened at our film club about a year ago. In the clip, the Dalai Lama deconstructs the present moment, so often essentialized in contemporary Buddhist discourse. He is clear: without past and future, there is no present, as it only has meaning in relation to past and future. This flies in the face of our own habit of essentializing the present moment at the expense of conceiving of ourselves as contingent, historical beings. It is a kind of meditative instruction that has ossified into Western Buddhist dogma.  More »
  • I Survived Ebola. But the Fight Doesn’t End There. Paid Member

    When Ashoka Mukpo speaks about the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, his words carry a compassion and humanity that can only come from firsthand experience. That’s because Mukpo, 33, is one of only a handful of Americans to contract Ebola in West Africa, where he was working as a cameraman with NBC News.  More »
  • Tashi Mannox: Calligrapher Paid Member

    Planetary Collective, founded in 2011, responds to the most pressing issues our civilization is currently facing as we push the planet to its brink. Its members, pulling from their Buddhist backgrounds, attribute the roots of the environmental and social crises facing humanity to the misperception that we are separate—from each other, the planet, and the cosmos as a whole. Their forthcoming feature film is titled Planetary. Learn more about the Collective here. More »