Theravada

The "Teaching of the Elders," rooted in the earliest complete teachings of the Buddha
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Absorbed in the Breath Paid Member

    The first jhana has five factors: (a) Directed thought: Think of the breath until you can recognize it clearly without getting distracted. (b) Singleness of object: Keep the mind with the breath. Don't let it stray after other objects. Watch over your thoughts so that they deal only with the breath until the breath becomes comfortable. (The mind becomes one, at rest with the breath.) (c) Evaluation: Let this comfortable breath sensation spread and coordinate with the other breath sensations in the body. Let these breath sensations spread until they all flow together. Once the body has been soothed by the breath, feelings of pain will grow calm. The body will be filled with good breath energy. These three qualities must be brought to bear on the same stream of breathing for the first jhana to arise. This stream of breathing can then take you all the way to the fourth jhana. Directed thought, singleness of object, and evaluation act as the causes. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    Seeing for Yourself Paid Member

    When I first went to study with my teacher, Ajaan Fuang, he handed me a small booklet of meditation instructions and sent me up the hill behind the monastery to meditate. The booklet—written by his teacher, Ajaan Lee—began with a breath meditation technique and concluded with a section showing how the technique was used to induce the first four levels of jhana. More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The Path of Serenity and Insight Paid Member

    There's no jhanafor one with no discernment, no discernment for one with no jhana. But one with both jhana and discernment: they're on the verge of Unbinding. -The Buddha, Dhammapada 372, translated by Thanissaro Bhikkhu More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    How to Transcend Dental Medication Paid Member

    A member of our monastery has very bad teeth. He has needed to have many teeth pulled out, but he'd rather not have the anesthetic. Eventually he found a dental surgeon in Perth who was willing to extract his teeth without anesthetic. He has been there several times. He finds it no problem. Allowing a tooth to be extracted by a dentist without anesthetic might seem impressive enough, but this character went one better. He pulled out his own tooth without anesthetic. We saw him, outside the monastery workshop, holding a freshly pulled tooth smeared with his blood, in the claws of an ordinary pair of pliers. It was no problem: he cleaned the pliers of blood before he returned them to the workshop. More »
  • Tricycle Community 8 comments

    Thirsting for Enlightenment Paid Member

    There are some apt similes for the first four meditative absorptions given by Buddhaghosa in his commentary, the “Visuddhimagga,” written in the fifth century. A man is wandering through the desert, carrying no water with him, and growing thirstier and thirstier. At last, he sees a pool in the distance and is filled with excitement and delight. More »