Theravada

The "Teaching of the Elders," rooted in the earliest complete teachings of the Buddha
  • Tricycle Community 9 comments

    Inviting Fear Paid Member

    Above all, a materialistic society desires certainty—it seeks to guarantee it; passes laws to enforce it; wipes our the pathogens that threaten it; and lets everyone have guns to protect it. Even the seemingly innocuous habits of inking in plans and clinging to beliefs and opinions are the reverse-image of the uncertainties that the heart yearns to be certain about. Yet, if we seek security in that which is inherently uncertain, dukkha, or discontent, is the inevitable result. More »
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    A Thousand Lives Away: Buddhism in Contemporary Burma Paid Member

    A Thousand Lives Away: Buddhism in Contemporary Burma By Winston J. King, forward by Edward Conze. Reissued by Asian Humanities Press: Fremont, California, 1990, 238 pp., paper, $15.95. More »
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    Loving the Enemy Paid Member

    •As a mother would risk her lifeto protect her only child, even so should one cultivate a limitless heart with regard to all beings. With goodwill for the entire cosmos, cultivate a limitless heart: Above, below, and all around, unobstructed, without hostility or hate. Whether standing, walking, sitting, or lying down, as long as one is alert, one should be resolved on this mindfulness. This is called a sublime abiding here and now. —The Buddha,from Sutta Nipata 1.8 • More »
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    What Do Buddhists Mean When They Talk About Emptiness? Paid Member

    Emptiness is a mode of perception, a way of looking at experience. It adds nothing to, and takes nothing away from, the raw data of physical and mental events. You look at events in the mind and the senses with no thought of whether there's anything lying behind them. More »
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    Mind Like a Mirror Paid Member

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    The Power of Judgment Paid Member

    When the Buddha told Ananda that the entirety of the practice lay in having an admirable friend, he wasn’t saying something warm and reassuring about the compassion of others. He was pointing out three uncomfortable truths—about delusion and trust—that call for clear powers of judgment. More »