Pure Land (Shin)

Mahayana school whose central figure is Amitabha, Buddha of the Infinite Light
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    "Shin Buddhism" by Taitetsu Unno Paid Member

    Shin Buddhism:Bits of Rubble Turn to GoldTaitetsu UnnoNew York: Doubleday, 2002224 pp.; $12.95 (paper) Imagine entering a spiritual bookstore in Tokyo and encountering a book with the title Awakening Your Inner Francis: How to Become a Catholic Saint in Seven Weeks or Less, and you will have a pretty good idea of how a lot of Asian Americans feel about many of the Buddhist books that have become popular in America today. Even the ones written by Asian teachers (often with significant editorial coaching) sometimes leave them feeling queasy. And no wonder. Who wants to see the thing they hold most precious and beautiful reduced to paint-by-numbers? Were the situation reversed, I would surely feel the same way. More »
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    Jodo Shinshu: The Way of Shinran Paid Member

    (Japanese National Treasure; courtesy of Itsukushima-Jinja) In recent years, Tricycle has featured a number of articles on Pure Land Buddhism, a tradition with which many of our readers have little familiarity. Because of its long history and extensive influence in Buddhism in the West, we have given particular emphasis to the Shin school of Pure Land, which was founded by Shinran (1173-1263), a Japanese monk that Rev. Dr. Alfred Bloom calls a "towering figure" in Buddhism. Read the articles below to get a sense of Shinran and his teachings, and the modern practice of Jodo Shinshu. More »
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    Come Together Paid Member

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    The Buddha of Infinite Light and Life Paid Member

    Taitetsu Unno, professor emeritus of religious studies at Smith College, is one of the major figures in post–World War II American Jodo Shinshu Buddhism. Besides his numerous scholarly publications on Buddhism, his books River of Fire, River of Water: An Introduction to the Pure Land Tradition of Shin Buddhism (Doubleday, 1998) and Shin Buddhism: Bits of Rubble Turn into Gold (Doubleday, 2002) have helped many people to discover the riches of this major Buddhist tradition. More »
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    Number One Fool Paid Member

    BUDDHISM IS A PATH of supreme optimism, for one of its basic tenets is that no human life or experience is to be wasted or forgotten, but all should be transformed into a source of wisdom and compassionate living. This is the connotation of the classical statement that sums up the goal of Buddhist life: "Transform delusion into enlightenment." On the everyday level of experience, Shin Buddhists speak of this transformation as "bits of rubble turn into gold." More »