Mahayana

The bodhisattva path of seeking complete enlightenment for the sake of all beings
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    The Heart Sutra Paid Member

    THE GREAT PRAJNA PARAMITA HEART SUTRA Avalokitesvara Bodhisattva doing deep Prajna Paramita Perceived the emptiness of all five conditions, and was freed of pain.O Sariputra, form is no other than emptiness, emptiness no other than form;Form is precisely emptiness, emptiness precisely form;Sensation, perception, reaction and consciousness are also like this.O Sariputra, all things are expressions of emptiness, not born, not destroyed,Not stained, not pure; neither waxing nor waning.Thus emptiness is not form; not sensation nor perception, reaction nor consciousness;No eye, ear, nose, tongue, body, mind;No color, sound, smell, taste, touch, thingNo realm of sight, no realm of consciousnessNo ignorance, no end to ignoranceNo old age and death, no cessation of old age and death More »
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    Cutting Ties: The Fruits of Solitude Paid Member

    The Great sage Shantideva composed The Way of the Bodhisattva in India over twelve centuries ago, yet it remains remarkably relevant for our times. This classic text gives surprisingly up-to-date instructions for people like you and me to live sanely and openheartedly, even in a very troubled world. It is the essential guidebook for fledging bodhisattvas, those spiritual warriors who long to alleviate suffering, their own and that of others. More »
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    Keeping a Good Heart Paid Member

    Chökyi Nyima Rinpoche was born in Tibet in 1951. He emigrated with his family shortly before the Chinese invasion in 1959. He was brought up by his father, Tulku Urgyen Rinpoche (1920-1995), considered one of the greatest Dzogchen masters of our time. Tulku Urgyen sent his son to study at the seat of the Sixteenth Karmapa, where he served as the Karmapa’s private attendant. Later, his father arranged for him to receive teachings from Dilgo Khyentse Rinpoche (1910-1991), the highly regarded head of the Nyingma order; he received the Dzogchen pith instructions from Tulku Urgyen himself. His friendly, inquisitive, and frank personality allowed him to cultivate close relationships with some of Tibet’s greatest masters. More »
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    The Precepts: A Special Practice Section Paid Member

    The Buddhist Precepts: An IntroductionMartine Bachelor More »
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    The Bodhisattva Vow: Eight Views Paid Member

    Tenzin Gyatso, the Fourteenth Dalai Lama "What do we mean by bodhisattva? Bodhi means enlightenment, the state devoid of all defects and endowed with all good qualities. Sattva refers to someone who has courage and confidence and who strives to attain enlightenment for the sake of all beings. Those who have this spontaneous, sincere wish to attain enlightenment for the ultimate benefit of all beings are called bodhisattvas. Through wisdom, they direct their minds to enlightenment, and through their compassion, they have concern for beings. This wish for perfect enlightenment for the sake of others is what we call bodhichitta, and it is the starting point on the path. By becoming aware of what enlightenment is, one understands not only that there is a goal to accomplish but also that it is possible to do so. Driven by the desire to help beings, one thinks, For their sake, I must attain enlightenment!" More »
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    What’s in a Mantra? Paid Member

    SO YOU’RE SITTING there, reciting the Heart Sutra, either the long version or the short version. Perhaps you do so every day. It has been recited millions of times over the centuries, without the person reciting it necessarily paying much attention to the meaning (whatever that might mean). But today, let’s imagine that you do. After dutifully negating each of the major categories of Buddhist philosophy (“no eye constituent up to and including no mental consciousness constituent, no ignorance, no extinction of ignorance, no aging and death up to and including no extinction of aging and death. More »