Mahayana

The bodhisattva path of seeking complete enlightenment for the sake of all beings
  • Turning Intention into Motivation Paid Member

    Framing our days between intention setting and joyful dedication, even once a week, can change how we live. It's a purposeful approach of self-awareness, conscious intention, and focused effort—three precious gifts of contemplative practice—by which we take responsibility for our thoughts and actions and take charge of our selves and our lives. As the Buddha put it, "You are your own enemy / and you are your own savior. " More »
  • Tricycle Community 1 comment

    Under One Umbrella Paid Member

    Buddhism: One Teacher, Many TraditionsBy The Dalai Lama and Thubten ChodronWisdom Publications, 2014352 pp.; $29.95 (Cloth)  More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    The World is Made of Stories Paid Member

    The American poet Muriel Rukeyser famously wrote that “the universe is made of stories, not of atoms.” We are not just animals that use language: we are storytelling creatures, for telling stories is a fundamental activity of all people in all cultures. The Canadian cognitive neuroscientist Merlin Donald expresses this well: More »
  • Tricycle Community 0 comments

    In the Garden: Forward with Flowers Paid Member

    April 18 is our thirty-ninth wedding anniversary. Peter and I journey north at dusk to Tomales Bay, a drowned rift valley bisected by the San Andreas Fault. What more romantic spot to celebrate long marriage than on the unstable strike and slip fault zone where two active continental plates grind up against each other far below the surface of dark water? To the east the landward flank of the North American Plate stretches out under thick riparian cover. Below briny waves to the west, the unhitched mass of the Pacific Plate inches north, a submerged sea mount bucking and snorting in slow motion toward the Gulf of Alaska. More »
  • Against “Common Sense” Buddhism Paid Member

    There’s an old story about a frog. He’s lived all his life in a well, and one day another frog appears at its rim. They get to talking, and the strange frog tells the older one that he’s come from somewhere called the ocean. “I never heard of that. I guess it’s about a quarter the size of my well?” “No. More than that,” answers the other. “OK—a half?” “Much bigger,” the strange frog laughs. “The same size, then?” “No, even bigger,” says the foreign frog. “Alright. This, I got to see,” says the oldster as he clambers out the well and sets out for the ocean. It’s a hard road, but at last he arrives. Unfortunately, when he sees the ocean, the shock is so great that it blows his mind and his head explodes. More »
  • The Dharma and the Artist's Eye Paid Member

    To consider oneself a Buddhist, says His Holiness the Dalai Lama, one must embrace the four noble truths expounded two and a half millennia ago by Shakyamuni Buddha during his 45 years as a teacher of the dharma. Regardless of one's lineage or tradition, these truths state that (1) there is suffering; (2) the cause of suffering is thirst (trishna), which most commentators interpret as being selfish desire; (3) there is a way to end suffering; and (4) that way is the eightfold path (arya astanga marga). Of the eight steps on this path, the one to which the others build and in which they triumphantly culminate is right mindfulness (samyak smrti). It is the root and fruit of all Buddhist practice.  More »