Filed in Tibetan

The Dalai Lama’s Little Book of Wisdom

The Essential Teachings

His Holiness The Dalai Lama

Wisdom Collection

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What do we understand by meditation? From the Buddhist point of view, meditation is a spiritual discipline, and one that allows you to have some degree of control over your thoughts and emotions.

Why is it that we don’t succeed in enjoying the lasting happiness that we are seeking? Buddhism explains that our normal state of mind is such that our thoughts and emotions are wild and unruly, and since we lack the mental discipline needed to tame them, we are powerless to control them. As a result, they control us. And thoughts and emotions, in their turn, tend to be controlled by our negative impulses rather than our positive ones. We need to reverse this cycle.

Hampton Roads Publishing Company (2009)

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whatalifefull's picture

Thank you....short and sweet. I read somewhere that " you can't solve the problems of the mind at the level of the mind". I can't solve mine there that's for sure, try as I might.

madyakker's picture

I was a bit confused myself, but it does say "Brief Teachings". It is brief.......but sweet!

Metta

Keith McLachlan's picture

As much as I like and admire the Dalai Lama, I never found his books to be very interesting.
Perhaps, it because most of them are ghost written.

There a lot better sources for meditation and mindfulness practice than the Dalai Lama. The names Jon Kabat-Zinn, Jan Chozen Bays, Toni Packer, Larry Rosenberg and others come to mind.

silcarry's picture

There are many styles of meditation. However, whatever meditation format works for you is definitely "the one" for you to adopt.
BTW, The Dalai Lama's Little Book of Wisdom IS a little book of that name, and it's and extract of little quotations from a teaching off HH (in London, I believe) some 18 years ago, It's full of meaningful small quotations.

robert nelder's picture

it is interesting that such a brief reflection generated all these responses... namaste

aaphayes's picture

This is what happens when we approach something with expectations and pre-conceived notions.

ramprasad's picture

However brief and inaccessible this article is, it does stimulate one's thoughts about the reality we face in our daily life. Yes, our thoughts jump from one to another with no appearance of continuity. I recall reading in one of the Zen classics Hekiganroku (The Blue Cliff Records) that such thoughts are called "nian-thoughts". They are fractions of mental activity that often do not form a complete idea, but are nevertheless there and linger on for as long as we let the mind think about them. It is frustrating to feel a sense of uneasiness when the thoughts do not gel. From Hekiganroku, Case 5 Seppo's "A Grain of Rice", the phrase "It is like the ox-head disappearing, and the horse-head appearing" that represents our instantaneous thoughts of consciousness. Perhaps this is one reason to meditate so that our focus can be established.

BenTremblay's picture

This little post is a teaser. see "To access the content within the Wisdom Collection, join Tricycle as a Supporting or Sustaining Member".

LOLA's picture

Note the title of the book. It is a sweet little book of profound words.

bobbykenny's picture

It said read the entire article in the wisdom section.

georgecolombo's picture

I think that was the article. (No one said it was a long article!)

srikumarsrao's picture

Same question. I couldn't find it either.

sjcinc's picture

Where is the article?