February 11, 2013

Meditation Month: Day 11, A Snowy Practice

Central Park

As I'm sure most of you know, it was quite a snowy weekend for those of us living in the Northeast. On Sunday morning I woke up early, planning to sit in my usual spot near my desk. But when I looked out the window at the snow-covered city I decided it was a perfect day to try the walking meditation that Sharon shares in the guide to Week Two. So I took my practice out into the winter wonderland. I wrapped myself in some warm layers, laced up my Bean Boots, filled a thermos with hot tea, and trekked over to Central Park. There, I found a quiet clearing and practiced walking meditation for half an hour.There were plenty of distractions in the park—igloo builders, cross-country skiers, rowdy snow-ball fights—but I did my best to let go of worrying what people would think of me walking back and forth in the same spot for 30 minutes and I focused on putting one foot in front of the other, letting my attention rest on the sensations in my feet and legs. Every few minutes a dog barking or drop of melting snow would break my concentration, but I followed Sharon's instructions and sped up my pace until my concentration was restored.

Afterward, I walked home from the park and instead of moving at my usual New Yorker pace (practically jogging), I walked slowly and with purpose, noticing things along the way that I hadn't absorbed in the many years I've lived in the neighborhood and paying attention to how my body felt as I slowly moved down the street, bringing mindful movement into my daily life.

—Rachel Hiles, Managing Editor

P.S.  I snapped the above photo after my sit—it was a gorgeous day!

Share with a Friend

Email to a Friend

Already a member? Log in to share this content.

You must be a Tricycle Community member to use this feature.

1. Join as a Basic Member

Signing up to Tricycle newsletters will enroll you as a free Tricycle Basic Member.You can opt out of our emails at any time from your account screen.

2. Enter Your Message Details

Enter multiple email addresses on separate lines or separate them with commas.