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January 17, 2009

Gary Snyder at the New York Public Libary on January 31st

GARY SNYDER The Pulitzer Prize-Winning Poet Reads and Talks About Origins and Influences And the Poets of His Generation Saturday, January 31 3:00-5:00 p.m. Introduction by Literary Essayist Eliot Weinberger, Author of "An Elemental Thing" THE NEW YORK PUBLIC LIBRARY South Court Auditorium Entrance on First Floor (Fifth Ave. Side) Take South Court Elevator to "A" (Auditorium) More »
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January 15, 2009

Sitting Online

Molly De Shong at Shambhala Sun Space discusses a 90-day meditation course from Vipassana Fellowship. The courses are lead by Andrew Quernmore. VF has been offering courses online since 1997. In February, Tricycle will be teaming up with Zen teachers around the country to offer our 90-day Zen meditation challenge. The Tricycle staff will begin the 90 days on February 23rd, and that same day Roshi Pat Enkyo O'Hara will kick things off with the first of her series of talks on Dogen's Genjokoan, which you can watch online. Stay tuned for more! Speaking of sitting online, Tree Leaf Zendo, home of daily online sit-alongs with Jundo Cohen since March 2007, is moving to Beliefnet! More »
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January 15, 2009

Dalai Lama on the economic crisis (part 2)

Michael at Awake in this Life accuses the Dalai Lama of oversimplification based on this statement by HH: Lack of spirituality and culture is the main cause behind the rampant corruption in the world. People have become selfish and materialistic, which has led to the economic slowdown. As it happens, economic expert John McCain struck a similar note, blaming the economic meltdown on the "greed of Wall Street." Is this actually what caused the global economic crisis? ("Slowdown" seems like a cruel euphemism -- It may be a slowdown in trading volume to Wall Streeters, and a slowdown in luxury items formerly flying off the shelves, but to most people it is far harsher than that.) In any case the essence of the Dalai Lama's statement is absolutely right. More »
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January 14, 2009

Big Buddha Week

Barbara O'Brien has a post on Big Buddha statues, and this week on her blog is Big Buddha Week! [Image: Japan's Nihonji Daibutsu (Great Buddha), carved into the side of Mount Nokogiri, is 101 feet (31 meters) tall. stoicviking, Flickr.com, Creative Commons License] More »
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January 14, 2009

Dalai Lama on the economic crisis

This just in from HHDL XIV, via the Telegraph: The exiled Tibetan spiritual leader said that the global economic meltdown is the result of a crisis of morality, which had been driven by greed and corruption. Selfishness and a lack of spirituality and culture in the world were key causes for the current crisis in the world's financial markets, he said. Is this too obvious or not obvious enough? More »
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January 13, 2009

Send us the latest!

Over the next couple weeks, we’ll be contacting Buddhist centers large and small across the country in an effort to put together ongoing weekly sangha updates for visitors to tricycle.com and readers of the magazine. Send us the latest news at your community...Have you booked a well known speaker? Are you starting up a new social venture? Is one of your teachers in poor health and in need of some help? We'll do our best to spread the word. This will not be a comprehensive listing of events and schedules (most of which can be found on the larger centers' websites), but rather a finger on the pulse of a wide range of Buddhist communities—all a way to stay in better touch with Buddhism at the local level. More »
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January 13, 2009

Are you addicted to sensation?

Then try this. Who's the guy with the chops by the unicorn supposed to be? HT: Daily Dish. More »
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January 13, 2009

Their Holinesses

Rod Meade Sperry at Shambhala Sun Space points out that His Holiness the Dalai Lama may be going to Rome to be made an honorary citizen. China won't be pleased, as Rod points out. And for that reason the Dalai Lama won't be invited to meet with His Holiness Benedict XVI. A great photo op -- blown! Because of the Vatican's touchy relationship with China -- everyone has a touchy relationship with China, but because of the position of the Catholic Church within China, the Vatican's is especially precarious -- the Holy See usually doesn't want to see the DL on its turf. More »
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January 13, 2009

Buddhism and Science

Buddhism and science: BFF? Many scientists seem to want to embrace Buddhism (it apparently beats the alternatives) and western Buddhists in turn want to be validated by science. This issue is a thorny one and has been sorta kinda addressed on this blog here and here. Ultimately no religion can (or should attempt to) accommodate the demands of science. More »
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January 09, 2009

Jeff Wilson's book and the Dalai Lama on homosexuality

Two hot topics on Danny Fisher's blog: the Dalai Lama on homosexuality (prompted by an email from an anonymous reader) and the new book Mourning the Unborn Dead by Jeff Wilson. More »
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January 08, 2009

Dana for Aitken Roshi

Truly one of the great ones. Hat tip: Ox Herding. More »
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January 08, 2009

Kagyu Monlam Chenmo; Sri Lankan editor killed

Barbara O'Brien has a post on the Kagyu Monlam Chenmo underway in Bodh Gaya, the patch of earth in India where the Buddha is said to have attained enlightenment. The 17th Karmapa presides. (Recall that there is something of a Karmapa controversy.) The festival runs from January 4th to 11th: More »
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January 08, 2009

Buddha Machine 2.0

You may recall the Buddha Machine, a Worst Horse favorite, and the more recent iPhone app. In the New Yorker, Sasha Frere-Jones details the Buddha Machine 2.0: More »
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January 08, 2009

Two events in New York on Tibet and the Environment

Two major Tibet events: Meltdown: The Impact of Climate Change on the Tibetan Plateau (with live video webcast) at the Asia Society in New York. January 16th 8am – 6pm Asia Society, 725 Park Avenue, New York, NY 10021 Most of Asia's major rivers find their source on the Tibetan plateau. More »
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January 07, 2009

The body is a Bodhi tree. . .

Wayne's Dhamma Blog describes a visit to Mei An, the southern Chinese temple built to honor the Sixth Zen Patriarch Huineng. Theres a whole series of plastic statues telling Huineng's story. At right is a photo from Wayne's blog of a diorama depicting the famous poetry contest between Huineng and Shenxiu with Hongren (the Fifth Patriarch, transliterated more like Hung-jen in my misspent youth) presiding. That should be Huineng in the dark blue and Shenxiu next to him, with Hongren in red at right? Plus another senior monk. More »
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January 06, 2009

Eat Less Beef III

From Audobon Magazine: Simply put, raising beef, pigs, sheep, chicken, and eggs is very, very energy intensive. More than half of all the grains grown in America actually go to feed animals, not people, says the World Resources Institute. That means a huge fraction of the petroleum-based herbicides, pesticides, and fertilizers applied to grains, plus staggering percentages of all agricultural land and water use, are put in the service of livestock. Stop eating animals and you use dramatically less fossil fuels, as much as 250 gallons less oil per year for vegans, says Cornell University’s David Pimentel, and 160 gallons less for egg-and-cheese-eating vegetarians. But fossil fuel combustion is just part of the climate–diet equation. More »
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January 05, 2009

God and Buddhism

Barbara O'Brien points us to Ed Halliwell of The (Manchester) Guardian on Buddhism and theism and the Buddha's famous refusal to not answer metaphysical questions: When I first started reading about the Buddha's life, I was disappointed to learn that the existence of God was one of the subjects on which he declined to make a definitive comment. At the time, this seemed to me either rather unfair or something of a cop-out – surely this was exactly the kind of topic that an awakened being should pronounce upon, for the benefit of all. More »
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January 05, 2009

Gary Snyder on his correspondence with Allen Ginsberg

The San Francicsco Chronicle discusses a recent reading the poet and environmental activist Gary Snyder gave in North Beach, the San Francisco neighborhood at the heart of the Beat scene. He read from the new book that collects his correspndence with Allen Ginsberg, spanning 35 years. Snyder cheerfully discusses the evolving media of correspondence: "Today, you'd do it all with cell phones and e-mail and you'd constantly be in touch with each other," Snyder said. More »
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January 04, 2009

Genpo Roshi in Deseret News

Via Precious Metal: It seems the perfect confluence of life events may have brought Dennis Genpo Merzel Roshi to Buddhism. Or at least prepared his mind for Buddhism to find him. It happened in 1971 while on a trip to the Mojave Desert. Genpo Roshi had climbed a mountain and was contemplating his life and purpose. The past years had brought him experiences with death, relationship struggles and also pain. While on the mountain, he had what he now considers a Zen experience. It was an awakening of the mind that shifted his perspective on life and made him more interested in serving others. More »
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January 02, 2009

Shaolin Monks to bring in Tourists

A Chinese city looks to the "kung-fu monks" to bring in tourists: The cluster of temples at the heart of this dusty, traffic-clogged town are picturesque reminders of China’s faded Buddhist past. On a recent day, dogs warmed themselves in the winter sun as a few toothless devotees bowed before smiling Buddhas. The only sounds were the occasional clanging of wind chimes and the splash of coins tossed into a mucky pond. While soothing to some, the tranquillity is galling to Guandu’s city fathers, who recently spent $3 million to rebuild the four temples. A Chinese city looks to the "kung-fu monks" to bring in tourists: More »